When Darwinism Reigns, “The Pyramid Is the Point”

alpha male, animals, beauty, biology, brutality, charm, condors, Culture & Ethics, CuriosityStream, Darwinian evolution, Darwinism, Discovery Institute, Evolution, gorillas, hierarchy, Intelligent Design, John Zmirak, personal interactions, pyramid, sea lionesses, teleology, The Stream, YouTube videos
The Darwinian view encourages a way of interacting with others where the aim is to “humiliate [one’s] lesser brethren, just to remind them who’s boss.” Source
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Can Natural Reward Theory Save Natural Selection?

alleles, animals, Burgess Shale, Cambrian Explosion, cotton, Darwinian theory, ecosystems, Evolution, foresight, fossil record, John Rust, Macroevolution, materialism, molecular machines, Monopoly, natural selection, Owen M. Gilbert, oxygen, pseudoscience, Rethinking Ecology, selection pressure, teleology, The Origin of Species, Thomas Malthus, University of Texas
An evolutionist dismantles natural selection, then tries to rescue it with his own theory. It won’t work. Source
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Look: On Thanksgiving, Be Grateful for the Intelligent Design of Your Eyes

animals, Cambrian Explosion, Cambrian News, camera eye, Center for Science & Culture, Charles Darwin, compound eyes, COVID-19, Darwinists, Discovery Institute, Evolution, evolutionists, eyes, fossil record, Intelligent Design, Jonathan Wells, lockdown, photon, Rachel Adams, Thanksgiving, trilobite, vertebrate eye, vision, Zombie Science
COVID restrictions may have put a damper on the traditional Thanksgiving celebration. But even lockdowns can't stop us from giving thanks. Source
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Kimberella — Conflicting Evidence from Taphonomy

ammonium chloride, animals, bilaterians, bivariate analysis, bottom waters, Burgess Shale, Cambrian Explosion, Cambrian News, Chengjiang, death-masks, Ediacaran Period, Evolution, feeding traces, fossil record, hyporeliefs, Kimberella, Kimberella series, Konservat Lagerstätten, latex casts, limpets, Maotianshan Shales, motility, Precambrian strata, taphonomy, trace fossils
The fossilization of Kimberella specimens was most likely based on rapid burial with sand during storm events. Source
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Doctor’s Diary: Evolution in the Country of the Blind

anatomy, animals, apes, atheists, babies, birth canal, Brazilian Academy of Sciences, childbirth, chromosomes, Creativity, DNA, ductus arteriosus, earthquake, Ecuador, foresight, H.G. Wells, heteropalindromes, human evolution, human exceptionalism, Human Origins, humans, Intelligent Design, invention, Marcos Eberlin, Minnesota, orphan genes, oxygen, P.Z. Myers, parable, Periodic Table, phenotypes, Richard Dawkins, The Country of the Blind, Tree of Life
Fans of H. G. Wells are probably familiar with his 1904 short story, “The Country of the Blind.” Source
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In Carbon Isotope Excursions, Darwinists Lose Another Excuse for the Cambrian Explosion

animals, arthropods, biology, bioRxiv, body plans, Cambrian Explosion, Cambrian fossils, Cambrian News, Cambrian phyla, Canada, carbon, carbon isotope excursions, Darwin's Doubt, Darwinian tree, Ediacaran explosion, Ediacaran fossils, Evolution, fossil record, Gaskiers deglaciation, geochemistry, Newfoundland, Oman, oxygen, PNAS, Proterozoic Eon, Stephen Meyer, Uncategorized
The claim that a spike in carbon isotope concentrations led to the explosion of biological diversity in the Cambrian doesn’t hold up, as if it would have helped, anyway. Source
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Why “Humanize”? A New Effort to Defend the Unique Dignity of Human Beings

animal rights, animal welfare, animals, Artificial Intelligence, Center on Human Exceptionalism, China, COVID-19, Culture & Ethics, Darwin Day in America, David Klinghoffer, Discovery Institute, Evolution, Evolution News, facial recognition, Falun Gong, human exceptionalism, Human Zoos, Humanize, humans, John West, La Bella Principessa, Leonardo da Vinci, Michael Egnor, quality of life, social credit, Steven J. Buri, The Biology of the Second Reich, Tom Shakely, transhumanism, triage, Uyghurs, Walter Bradley Center, Wesley Smith
Hello. My name is Wesley J. Smith and I am honored to be chairman of Discovery Institute’s Center on Human Exceptionalism. I am writing to you here to introduce the CHE’s new blog, which we call Humanize. Humanize will complement and supplement the important work of the Center for Science & Culture and its invaluable Evolution News site.  Why did we choose “Humanize” as the name for the site? The once self-evident truth of human exceptionalism is under intensifying attack, as readers of Evolution News know well. Indeed, one of the tragic trends in thinking about evolution has been to blur the distinction between humans and animals. History warns us not to regard this lightly. Recent documentaries by Discovery Institute Vice President John West, Human Zoos and The Biology of…
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Rats Are People, Too!

ambassador, Animal Welfare Act, animals, anthropocentrism, bioethicists, Culture & Ethics, human exceptionalism, humans, Jane Goodall, Kristen Andrews, lab rats, medical experiments, Medicine, mice, misanthropy, monkeys, Nuremberg Code, philosophy, rats, reduction, refinement, replacement, Susana Monsó
If animal-rights activists ever had their way, all uses of animals by humans would cease — no matter how beneficial to our welfare and thriving. That emphatically includes animal research in medical and scientific experiments.  Animal rights activists falsely claim that no value to humans comes from such experiments — a claim I have rebutted often. Not only does animal research save human lives and offer invaluable information about biology, but it has also been deemed a crucial human-rights protection. The Nuremberg Code specifically stated that animal studies must be conducted before human subject research. International laws and protocols have encoded this wisdom. Rats Are “Empathetic”? But animal rights activists keep fighting. The latest effort — by Kristen Andrews, a professor of philosophy, and Susana Monsó, a bioethicist — argues that…
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