Shaw, Scientism, and Darwinism

Androcles and the Lion, Aristophanes, Arms and the Man, Back to Methuselah, Barbara Undershaft, Candida, Charles Dickens, Culture & Ethics, Darwinism, G. K. Chesterton, George Bernard Shaw, Great Britain, Hard Times, Jacques Barzun, John P. Gluck, London, Ludwig van Beethoven, Malcolm Muggeridge, Manchester Guardian, Pygmalion, Russia, Salvation Army, scientism, Shaw Chesterton series, St. Joan, The Restoration of Man, Tom Stoppard, Victorian England
George Bernard Shaw’s positive criterion by which to measure and ridicule folly and vice was fatally ambiguous, eclectic, and inconstant. Source
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C. S. Lewis, Science, and Science Fiction

Arthur C. Clarke, Back to Methuselah, C.H. Waddington, C.S. Lewis, Childhood’s End, Culture & Ethics, Darwinism, eugenics, Evolution, Francis Galton, George Bernard Shaw, H.G. Wells, J.B.S. Haldane, Olaf Stapledon, Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, Possible Worlds, Science & Ethics, science fiction, scientism, Star Maker, Tao, Technology, That Hideous Strength, The Abolition of Man, the Flesh and the Devil, The Shape of Things to Come, The Social Function of Science, The World
Was C. S. Lewis an enemy of science? The apparent answer to this question is no. Source
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