Darwin Is on the Roof — New Book from Michael Behe, Out Today

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The public is being prepared very slowly for the demise of Darwinian evolutionary theory. It wasn’t planned this way, but it is how things are playing out. Source
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Michael Denton Explore the Miracle of Air and Sun

air, biochemistry, biology, Children of Light, cosmos, Discovery Institute, ID The Future, Intelligent Design, Michael Denton, planetary fine-tuning, sunlight
A classic episode of ID the Future shines a light on Discovery Institute biochemist Michael Denton’s book, Children of Light: The Astonishing Properties of Sunlight that Make Us Possible. Denton explores the properties of sun and air. Download the podcast or listen to it here. In Children of Light, Denton shows how sun and air are crucial parts of the larger story of our fine-tuned place in the cosmos. Or as he puts it in the book, “Whatever the cause and whatever the ultimate explanation, nature appears to be fine-tuned to an astonishing degree for beings of our biology.” Photo credit: Ingmar H on Unsplash. The post Michael Denton Explore the Miracle of Air and Sun appeared first on Evolution News.
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More Hints of Order in the Genome

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Genomics has come a long way since the central dogma (the notion that DNA is the master controller that calls all the shots) and junk DNA (the expectation that much of the genome is non-functional). If scientists ditch those old dogmas and approach the genome expecting to find reasons for things, they often do. Synonymous Mutations To-may-to or to-mah-to? The British write flavour; the Americans write flavor, but generally each understands the other without too much difficulty. Genomes, too, have alternate ways of spelling things: GGU and GGC in messenger RNA both spell glycine. No big deal, thought geneticists; these “silent” mutations cause no change in the resulting protein. At the University of Notre Dame, however, biochemists are finding that the differences in spelling are not just background noise; they…
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Episode 4 of Secrets of the Cell — Broken Wolves and other Evolutionary Conundrums

biochemistry, biological information, broken wolves, creative power, DNA, Dogs, E. coli, Evolution, Evolution News, genes, genetic function, Intelligent Design, Michael Behe, mutations, polar bears, Richard Lenski, Secrets of the Cell, wolves
On a new episode of Secrets of the Cell with Michael Behe, the famed biochemist and intelligent design proponent briefly examines several evolutionary icons. These are living species that are considered by Darwinists as slam-dunk evidence of unguided evolution’s creative power, but that turn out to be just the opposite: Dogs, for one, in their great variety descend from wolves. Atheist biologist Richard Dawkins and others have pointed to man’s best friend as confirmation that evolution creatively builds new species. Behe explains, though, that when the cell’s secrets are considered — biological information at the DNA level — we discover that dogs are broken wolves. Of course that doesn’t make them any less loveable. They evolved largely by losing genetic functions through mutation. As Dr. Behe explains, “The mutations don’t…
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The Ultimate Recycler

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When a city starts out with a major energy deficit, there are two changes that should be made: to be really, and I mean really efficient at recycling the critical resource, or to buy more energy. What about in biology? Cells are like cities, right? Out of Balance We already know from a previous post (“The Mystery of Energy Metabolism”) that the cell has an energy budget that is out of balance based solely on biosynthesis and use of ATP. It is in a predicament. It has an extreme shortfall in ATP in its balance sheet, needing six ATP just to make one. ATP is a high energy molecule. All that energy has to be loaded into the molecule during its synthesis by using up other ATP molecules. If chemical A is…
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Q&A with Michael Behe: New Examples of Irreducible Complexity

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“What have you done for me lately?” So jokes biochemist Michael Behe, paraphrasing a question he often gets. In other words, Professor Behe, we know about the iconic bacterial flagellum. But are there other, newer examples of irreducible complexity? Yes, there are. In a Q&A session to highlight his 41-part DiscoveryU video course on ID, “Michael Behe Investigates Evolution and Intelligent Design,” Dr. Behe explains that in fact research in biology brings to light previously unknown irreducibly complex wonders — the most sophisticated showing “design building upon design,” as he puts it — by the month or even the week. His details a few. Find more information about the video course here! The post Q&A with Michael Behe: New Examples of Irreducible Complexity appeared first on Evolution News.
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