What Subduction Teaches About Intelligent Design

carbon, chalk, continental crust, erosion, Great Oxidation Event, Intelligent Design, limestone, mantle, Michael Denton, Nature Communications, Nature Geoscience, nitrogen, oceanic crust, oceanic sediments, phosphorous, plate tectonics, scientific papers, solar system, subduction, sulfur, The Wonder of Water, volcanos
My PhD research was on the early plate tectonic history on earth. Plate tectonics involves the movement of plates on the surface of the earth. Source
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Epiphany — Denton on Nature’s Fitness for Life

astrobiology, carbon, carbon chemistry, carbon-based life, Friedrich Wöhler, intelligent agency, Intelligent Design, Life Sciences, Michael Denton, organic chemistry, silicon-based life, teleology, The Miracle of the Cell, The Wonder of Water, vitalism
Biologists once wondered about a “life force,” but Michael Denton sees intelligence in the design of carbon, its unique properties, and its relation to water. Source
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Michael Denton Identifies TWO Intelligent Designs in the Universe

Big Bang, biology, carbon, Chemistry, consciousness, Discovery Institute, fine-tuning, fitness, Francis Bacon, Intelligent Design, life, mankind, medieval synthesis, Michael Denton, Middle Ages, mind, nature, organs, physics, Reconquista, The Fitness of Nature for Mankind, The Miracle of the Cell
“The whole world works together in the service of man,” as Francis Bacon wrote. Denton revives this ancient insight with modern rigor. Source
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In Carbon Isotope Excursions, Darwinists Lose Another Excuse for the Cambrian Explosion

animals, arthropods, biology, bioRxiv, body plans, Cambrian Explosion, Cambrian fossils, Cambrian News, Cambrian phyla, Canada, carbon, carbon isotope excursions, Darwin's Doubt, Darwinian tree, Ediacaran explosion, Ediacaran fossils, Evolution, fossil record, Gaskiers deglaciation, geochemistry, Newfoundland, Oman, oxygen, PNAS, Proterozoic Eon, Stephen Meyer, Uncategorized
The claim that a spike in carbon isotope concentrations led to the explosion of biological diversity in the Cambrian doesn’t hold up, as if it would have helped, anyway. Source
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The “Surprisingly Consistent” Answer to the Question: Are We Alone in the Universe?

a posteriori reasoning, abiogenesis, astrobiology, astronomy, biology, brain, Breakthrough Listen, carbon, consciousness, consensus, Danny C Price, Darwinism, Dyson Sphere, earth, extraterrestrial life, faith, Jeffrey Epstein, Lee Spitler, Macquarie University, Mars, materialism, neuroscience, nitrogen, Orsola De Marco, oxygen, Physics, Earth & Space, science fiction, SETI, starlight, universe
You can understand a lot about modern science if you understand SETI research. Not that SETI is all that sophisticated and certainly not because it’s been successful (it has not), but because it tells you a lot about the materialist metaphysical bias in modern science.  “The Big Question” From The Conversation: Are we alone in the Universe? The expert opinion on that, it turns out, is surprisingly consistent. “Is there other life in the Universe? I would say: probably,” Daniel Zucker, Associate Professor of astronomy at Macquarie University, tells astrophysics student and The Conversation’s editorial intern Antonio Tarquinio on today’s podcast episode. “I think that we will discover life outside of Earth in my lifetime. If not that, then in your lifetime,” says his fellow Macquarie University colleague, Professor Orsola…
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Molybdenum Is Stored in Cells by a Powered Piercing Machine

anhydride hydrolysis, armor, armor-piercing bullets, ATP, ATP-binding groove, bacteria, Biochemistry (journal), biomineralization, carbon, chemical energy, Chile, China, diet, DNA replication, Earth’s crust, Energy, energy metabolism, entropy, Evolution, genetic information, gun, human body, industry, Intelligent Design, kinetic energy, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, melting point, metal, molecular machines, molybdate, molybdenum, MoSto system, motility, nitrogen, PNAS, protein, steel, Steffen Brünle, sulfur, United States
Molybdenum comprises the second smallest percentage of mass in a normal human body, but that trace amount serves a vital function in several key enzymes. Chemical element molybdenum, affectionately called “moly” by manufacturers, is classified as a refractory metal (i.e., able to retain its shape when heated), bearing similarities to lead. It was only declared a chemical element in 1790 with the abbreviation Mo. Because of its very high melting point, it is prized in industry for its ability to toughen steel and armor. Molybdenum’s abundance in Earth’s crust is estimated at 1.2 ppm, mined mostly in China, the United States, and Chile (molybdenum.com). An Essential Element Why would soft, squishy biology need such a hard substance? The answer is that without it, life would not be possible. A 2009…
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