Old Wine in New Bottles: How Darwin Recruited Malthus to Fortify a Failed Idea from Antiquity

abiogenesis, Alphonse de Candolle, Aristotle, atheists, atomism, Charles Bradlaugh, Charles Darwin, Charles Lyell, Christianity, complexification, David Hume, Edward Aveling, Epicurus, Erasmus Darwin, Evolution, Friedrich Engels, Georges Cuvier, Gertrude Himmelfarb, Greece, Homo sapiens, Intelligent Design, Karl Marx, Law of Correlation, Lucretius, Matthew Arnold, Middle Ages, natural selection, Origin of Species, Patrick Matthew, Plato, Poor Law, Rome, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas Malthus, transhumanism, Unmoved Mover, Victorian England, William Paley
It was undoubtedly a tremendous philosophical coup for Darwin whose knowledge of formal philosophy was limited. Source
Read More

Darwin and the British Secularist Tradition

Adrian Desmond, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Anglicanism, Baron d’Holbach, Charles Bradlaugh, Charles Darwin, Crisis of Doubt, Culture, Dover Beach, Edward Aveling, Erasmus Darwin, Faith & Science, In Memoriam, James Moore, John Henry Gordon, Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Leslie Stephen, Matthew Arnold, Origin of Species, Oxbridge, Robert Chambers, Secularism, The Oracle of Reason, The Rights of Man, Timothy Larsen, Tom Paine, Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation, Victorian England
The arresting historical vignette of Darwin’s fraught meeting with Bradlaugh and Aveling at his country retreat would doubtless make for a good TV docudrama. Source
Read More