Why Should a Baby Live?

abortion, Alberto Giubilini, babies, Caenorhabditis elegans, Culture & Ethics, Danio rerio, Darwin Day in America, developmental biology, Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila simulans, embryonic age, empirical science, fallopian tube, fertilization, fetus, Francesca Minerva, gastrulation, Haeckel’s embryos, Homo sapiens, human being, humans, identical twins, John West, last menstrual period, Lewis Wolpert, materialistic philosophy, materialistic science, Medicine, monozygotic twins, mother, ovulation, pain, phylotypic stage, Roman Catholicism, zygote
My title is adapted from a 2012 article by two philosophers, Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva. Source
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Journalist Finds a “Cover-Up” by the Bronx Zoo

apology, Black Lives Matter, Bronx Zoo, cover-up, Cristián Samper, Culture & Ethics, Darwinian theory, eugenics, Evolution, George Floyd, Human Zoos, John West, National Zoo, New York Times, News Media, newspapers, Ota Benga, Pamela Newkirk, pseudoscientific racism, Racism, Spectacle: The Astonishing Life of Ota Benga, stonewalling, The Gathering of Animals, Wildlife Conservation Society, William Bridges, William Hornaday
It wasn’t until they were forced by events that the Zoo and the Wildlife Conservation Society admitted this black life mattered. Source
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C. S. Lewis and Critical Reactions to Transhumanism

Artificial Intelligence, Big Brother, biotechnology, C.S. Lewis, cognitive performance, Culture & Ethics, Francis Fukuyama, genetic engineering, George Bernard Shaw, Hava Tirosh-Samuelson, history, J. D. Bernal, J.B.S. Haldane, life-extension strategies, Olaf Stapledon, pharmaceutical enhancements, posthuman, regenerative medicine, Silicon Valley, Singularity University, That Hideous Strength, The Abolition of Man, transhumanism
I will briefly review two prominent voices in the opposition camp who reflect concerns at the heart of C. S. Lewis’s own case. Source
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C. S. Lewis, Science, and Science Fiction

Arthur C. Clarke, Back to Methuselah, C.H. Waddington, C.S. Lewis, Childhood’s End, Culture & Ethics, Darwinism, eugenics, Evolution, Francis Galton, George Bernard Shaw, H.G. Wells, J.B.S. Haldane, Olaf Stapledon, Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, Possible Worlds, Science & Ethics, science fiction, scientism, Star Maker, Tao, Technology, That Hideous Strength, The Abolition of Man, the Flesh and the Devil, The Shape of Things to Come, The Social Function of Science, The World
Was C. S. Lewis an enemy of science? The apparent answer to this question is no. Source
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The Main Argument of The Abolition of Man

Alec King, Aristotle, British schools, C.S. Lewis, Christianity, Culture & Ethics, debunking, England, English, Friedrich Nietzsche, Gaius, Hinduism, literature, Martin Ketley, Men without Chests, pedagogy, philosophy, Plato, propaganda, Saint Augustine, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, sublime, Tao, That Hideous Strength, The Abolition of Man, The Conditioners, The Control of Language, The Green Book, Thomas Traherne, thumos, Titius, upper forms, values, Wheaton College
Lewis foresees a class of men called “the Conditioners.” The Conditioners have “seen through” all attempts to ground behaviour in any ultimate truth. Source
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That Hideous Strength — C. S. Lewis’s Fantasia of Consciousness at 75

A.D. Nuttall, Abraham Lincoln, Aldous Huxley, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Alfred North Whitehead, Bertrand Russell, Brave New World, Burke, C. P. Snow, Clarence Darrow, Culture & Ethics, Dante, Darwinian theory, David Hume, Deborah Blum, Dickens, Dr. Faustus, E. A. Burtt, Emma Goldman, Evgeny Zamyatin, F. R. Leavis, Frederick Douglass, Friedrich Nietzsche, From Darwin to Hitler, Fyodor Dostoevsky, G. E. M. Anscombe, G. K. Chesterton, Ghost Hunters, Gulag Archipelago, H. L. Mencken, J. D. Bernal, J.B.S. Haldane, Jacques Maritain, Jane Austen, John Dewey, Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., Leszek Kolakowski, Logical Positivists, Lord Acton, Malcolm Muggeridge, Marquis de Sade, Marxists, Max Stirner, metaphysical fiction, Michael Polanyi, Msgr. R.H. Benson, National Institute of Coordinated Experiments, Petrarch, Pierre Duhem, Richard III, Samuel Johnson, Social Darwinism, space-fiction, St. Francis of Assisi, Stanley L. Jaki, Superman, T.S. Eliot, That Hideous Strength, The Alienation of Reason, The Intellectuals and the Masses, The Man Who Was Thursday, The Metaphysical Foundations of Modern Physical Science, The Odyssey, Thomas Carlyle, William Jennings Bryan, William Shakespeare, Yuval Harari
The novel is a narrative, fictional version of a philosophical anatomy of the satanic dimension and implication of much modern history from 1914 onwards. Source
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