Sleep on It: Design in the Subconscious Brain

birds, circadian clock, Darwinism, Ernst Haeckel, evolutionists, firefighters, fruit flies, functional information, humans, infants, insects, Intelligent Design, mammals, natural selection, neural signaling, neurons, Neuroscience & Mind, NREM, phylogeny, rapid eye movement, rats, reptiles, roundworms, Science Advances, sleep, zebra finches
An international team reasoned there had to be a purpose for sleep. In one of the largest datasets ever collected, they believe they found two functions. Source
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Darwinism as Hegelian Dialectics Applied to Biology

act, anti-intellectualism, Aristotle, Artificial Selection, atheists, biological adaptation, biology, captialism, censorship, Communism, Darwinism, eugenics, Evangelical Christians, Evolution, Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed, feudalism, Friedrich Engels, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Hegelian dialectics, Karl Marx, materialism, metaphysics, potency, purpose, synthesis, V.I. Lenin, violence
Nineteenth-century Darwinism was much more than a revolutionary scientific theory. Source
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Why Intelligent Design Had to Be the First to Face the Guillotine

academic freedom, American Revolution, arson, consensus, conservatives, Darwinism, David Coppedge, Douglas Axe, free speech, French Revolution, God and Man at Yale, Günter Bechly, Intelligent Design, John Adams, looting, Marxism, Oregon, Portland, Richard Sternberg, rioting, Roger Kimball, Scott Minnich, Stephen Meyer, The New Criterion, The Origins of Totalitarianism, Thomas Jefferson, Tony Woodlief, University of Portland, Wall Street Journal, Wesley Smith, William F. Buckley Jr., Willmoore Kendall, Yale University
In Wesley J. Smith’s phrase, in the present cultural moment, we have witnessed “the French Revolution attacking the American Revolution.” Source
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C. S. Lewis, Science, and Science Fiction

Arthur C. Clarke, Back to Methuselah, C.H. Waddington, C.S. Lewis, Childhood’s End, Culture & Ethics, Darwinism, eugenics, Evolution, Francis Galton, George Bernard Shaw, H.G. Wells, J.B.S. Haldane, Olaf Stapledon, Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, Possible Worlds, Science & Ethics, science fiction, scientism, Star Maker, Tao, Technology, That Hideous Strength, The Abolition of Man, the Flesh and the Devil, The Shape of Things to Come, The Social Function of Science, The World
Was C. S. Lewis an enemy of science? The apparent answer to this question is no. Source
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Ignoring the Obvious: Convergent Evolution in Strickberger’s Evolution

adaptive challenges, Benedikt Hallgrimsson, biology, Brian K. Hall, convergence, convergent evolution, Darwinism, engineer, Ernst Mayr, Evolution, flowering plants, Francois Jacob, George Ledyard Stebbins, natural selection, neo-Darwinian theory, parallelism, plant evolution, Simon Conway Morris, St. George Jackson Mivart, Strickberger’s Evolution, textbooks, The Origin of Species, tinkerer, What Evolution Is
Remarkably, even Ernst Mayr was forced to tacitly acknowledge the challenge to Darwinism posed by convergence. Source
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Evolution Can’t Explain Sexual Modesty; Why Not?

anthropology, Antifa, Arabian babbler, bird species, Culture, Darwinism, décolletage, dress, Evolution, evolutionists, Hays Code, Human Origins, humans, I Love Lucy, intimacy, leading lady, Lucy and Ricky Ricardo, materialist science, melodramas, nudism, police, Portland, protests, sex, silent films, speech, Yitzchak Ben Mocha
Darwinism is supposed to be a universal theory about biological diversity advancing through reproduction. Could such a basic observation be beyond its scope? Source
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Memory Purge: Eugenicist Margaret Sanger Gets Canceled by Planned Parenthood

Ben Carson, Black Lives Matter, black neighborhoods, cancel culture, Charles Darwin, civil rights, Culture & Ethics, Darwinism, eugenics, Evolution, Fox News, Human Zoos, John West, Karen Seltzer, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger Square, New York City, Planned Parenthood, scientific racism, The Stream, Washington Times
Planned Parenthood seeks a way to quiet a controversy without searching its own soul. Source
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Bari Weiss Knows What ID Scientists Already Knew

academia, Bari Weiss, biology, canaries, censorship, Darwinism, discrimination, dissent, Douglas Axe, eric hedin, Evolution, Free Science, free speech, Granville Sewell, Günter Bechly, hostile work environment, Intelligent Design, journalists, Michael Egnor, New York Times, Richard Sternberg, scientists, Scott Minnich, self-censorship, Smithsonian Institution, thunderdome
Advocates of intelligent design have experienced the lengths to which upholders of the “predetermined narrative” will go to punish dissent. Source
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Cancel Caribou? Another Questionable Tribute at the American Museum of Natural History

alt-right, American Museum of Natural History, Benjamin Tillman, Central Park West, Confederacy, Darwinian scientists, Darwinism, eugenics, Evolution, German Southwest Africa, Grant’s Caribou, history, human breeding, Human Zoos, John West, John Zmirak, Kanye West, Ku Klux Klan, Madison Grant, Margaret Sanger, Planned Parenthood, Rangifer tarandus granti, Richard Spencer, South Carolina, statues, The Biology of the Second Reich, The Passing of the Great Race, Theodore Roosevelt
The role of science in justifying racism and eugenics is a subject that needs to be opened up wide, not decorously ignored any longer. Source
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Darwinism and “No Lives Matter”

alt-right, Center for Science & Culture, Charles Darwin, churches, Culture & Ethics, Darwinism, Evolution, evolutionists, Francis Scott Key, ID The Future, Mike Keas, No Lives Matter, Peter Singer, Podcast, pseudoscience, Racism, Richard Weikart, scientific racism, Shrewsbury, statues, Ulysses Grant, V.I. Lenin, vandals, white nationalists
I’ve wondered if the marauding vandals will come eventually for the Darwin statues. I hope NOT, but let’s face it — between Francis Scott Key or Ulysses Grant, on one hand, and Charles Darwin on the other, whose work has done more to undergird racism? There’s no contest.  A classic episode of ID the Future, republished now, is eerie in its relevance to the culture at the moment. Host and science historian Michael Keas interviewed historian and Center for Science & Culture Senior Fellow Richard Weikart about the racial pseudoscience that’s integral to the Darwinian scientific heritage. As Professor Weikart explains, Darwin’s racism is not incidental to his case for evolution. It’s not as if he was merely a product of his time, with the reprehensible attitudes held by other…
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