Animals Set World Records

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, chameleon, cockroaches, Colorado, Darwinism, Duke University, Florida Museum of Natural History, froghopper, Gerris latiabdominis, Intelligent Design, leg jitter, Mexican free-tailed bats, Mexico, Nature (journal), New Scientist, Pipistrellus nathusii, planthopper, slingshot spider, Spiderman, Theridiosomatidae, water strider
Some of the most unexpected animals, many of them tiny, are capable of world-record feats. Source
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Applied Intelligent Design: Engineers Know Engineering When They See It

American Chemical Society, biologists, Biomimetics, biomimicry, butterfly wings, China, coral, Duke University, engineers, fish scales, geckos, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech, Intelligent Design, Johns Hopkins University, leaf, leaves, Life Sciences, materials science, Michael Varenberg, Nanjing Tech University, nanowires, New Scientist, polymers, Teflon, telescopes
Engineers of all types (e.g., mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, civil, software) are focused on how to get things to work. They need to pull together all that is known about materials and properties, and organize them to perform a function. They need to meet design requirements: a company or government says “Here is what we need to do; how can we get it done within the limits of cost and time available?” Knowledge of engineering principles grows as the needs of a society grow, often becoming more sophisticated, pushing the boundaries of know-how. Engineers are trained to see design and judge good design. Human engineers must also navigate intellectual property laws, because many engineers want to patent their designs and protect them from theft. There’s a lot of angst going on…
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