Vindicated But Not Cited: Paper in Nature Heredity Supports Michael Behe’s Devolution Hypothesis

adaptation, Andrew Murray, Current Biology, Darwin Devolves, Darwinian mechanism, devolution, Evolution, function, gene loss, genes, Intelligent Design, John Maynard Smith, loss-of-function mutations, Michael Behe, mutations, natural selection, Nature Heredity, phenotypes, The Quarterly Review of Biology
The literature is looking at the same data that intelligent design proponents are looking at, making similar observations, and asking similar questions. Source
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Excerpt: An Obstacle to Darwinian Evolution

American Museum of Natural History, bacterial flagellum, Brown University, Cambridge University Press, Darwinian processes, Darwinism, Debating Design, Evolution, function, Intelligent Design, Irreducible Complexity, John McDonald, John Polkinghorne, Kenneth Miller, key chain, Michael Ruse, National Center for Science Education, paperweight, parts, Paul Davies, Richard Swinburne, rotary propulsion, Stuart Kauffman, toothpicks, type III secretion system, William Dembski
Rather than showing how their theory could handle the obstacle, some Darwinists are hoping to get around irreducible complexity by verbal tap dancing. Source
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Important Medical Effects but Modest Mutations

Charles Darwin, CypA, Darwin Devolves, Darwinian processes, Evolution, FCT, function, Functional-Coded-elemenT, HIV, information, isoform, natural selection, New Scientist, Origin of Species, owl monkey, protein, random mutation, retroviruses, rhesus macaque, RNA, The Quarterly Review of Biology, TRIM5
I was asked to address a comment left by a viewer of one of Discovery’s YouTube videos. The comment is:1 Some monkeys have a mutation in a protein called TRIM5 that results in a piece of another, defunct protein being tacked onto TRIM5. The result is a hybrid protein called TRIM5-CypA, which can protect cells from infection with retroviruses such as HIV. Here, a single mutation has resulted in a new protein with a new and potentially vital function. New protein, new function, new information. A bit of Googling shows that the text was taken word-for-word from an old article (2008) on the New Scientist website2 (perhaps by way of intermediate copying). That was during a period when the 150th anniversary of the publication of the Origin of Species was…
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BioEssays Editor: “‘Junk’ DNA… Full of Information!” Including Genome-Sized “Genomic Code”

adenine, Advanced Science News, Andrew Moore, BioEssays, Biological Information: New Perspectives, cytosine, DNA, ENCODE, Evolution, Francis Crick, function, genome, genomic code, Giorgio Bernardi, guanine, Intelligent Design, isochores, Junk DNA, Leslie Orgel, narrative gloss, overlapping codes, proteins, selective pressure, thymine, viral genomes
How many times have we heard it claimed that the vast majority of the human genome is “junk” and therefore could not have been designed? Even in the face of overwhelming evidence from the ENCODE project and numerous other studies showing that most of our genome has biochemical function, most evolutionists still maintain that our genomes are largely junk. But a few brave scientists, including some rare evolutionists, have been willing to buck that trend.  In a new article at Advanced Science News — “That ‘Junk’ DNA… Is Full of Information!” — Andrew Moore, the Editor-in-Chief of the respected biology journal BioEssays, comments on a new BioEssays paper. The paper finds that our DNA contains overlapping layered “’dual-function’ pieces of information,” including a “genomic code” that spans virtually the entire…
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