Life Without Purpose — The Fundamental Flaw

Alan Watts, Aristotle, biology, biomolecules, Charles Darwin, CHNOPS, embryogenesis, emergence, Etienne Gilson, Evolution, From Aristotle to Darwin and Back Again, function, Galileo Galilei, Intelligent Design, Isaac Newton, life, Life Sciences, Nicolaus Copernicus, origin of life, parts, primordial soup, science of purpose, structure, telos, The Book, Thomas Aquinas, whole, Zen masters
The fundamental flaw in the conventional approach to understanding life is that we think we can fully understand the whole by looking at the individual parts. Source
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UFOs Replay History: Rogan, Keating, and “Things Seen in the Skies”

airfields, aliens, Aristotle, astrophysicists, Bible, Brian Keating, Carl Jung, Catholic Church, Congress, conspiracy, curiosity, Faith & Science, Flying Saucers (book), Galileo Galilei, government, Joe Rogan, Joe Rogan Experience, mandala, military facilities, NASA, Physics, Earth & Space, pilots, psychologists, PSYOP, Russian, Sanskrit, soul, Spotify, Stephen Meyer, synchronicity, UAPs, UC San Diego, UFOs, United States
Psychologist Carl Jung got interested in UFOs around 1946, shortly after the development of the atom bomb. Source
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Italian Center on Intelligent Design Holds Launch Event

Austria, Bechly, Carlo Alberto Cossano, Center for Biocomplexity and Natural Teleology, Center for Science & Culture, Cesare Lombroso, Charles Darwin, COVID-19, criminals, Discovery Institute, Dissent from Darwinism, Events, Evolution, Ferdinando Catalano, Galileo Galilei, Giuseppe Sermonti, Human Zoos, Intelligent Design, Italy, John West, Kingdom of Italy, Marco Respinti, philosophers, scientists, theologians, Turin, University of Molise, University of Padua, YouTube videos
The city of Turin was an especially fitting place for the public launch of a group focusing on intelligent design. Source
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Stephen Meyer Takes Questions, Including: “Has Science Matured Past Its Christian Origins?”

"God of the gaps", Catholicism, Christianity, Dallas Conference on Science and Faith, dark energy, dark matter, ether, Faith & Science, Galileo Galilei, Hebrew Bible, Isaac Newton, John West, mathematics, Neil deGrasse Tyson, neo-Platonism, philosophy, Physics, Earth & Space, Reformation, Renaissance, Return of the God Hypothesis, scientists, theism
Granted that the early scientists were Christians, does it follow that science necessarily supports Christianity or any form of theism? Source
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John Bloom on the Match that Lit the Scientific Revolution

alchemy, Ancient Near East, astrology, astronomy, Casey Luskin, Chemistry, Christianity, Faith & Science, Francis Bacon, Galileo Galilei, ID The Future, Johannes Kepler, John Bloom, Judeo-Christian tradition, Nicolaus Copernicus, physics, Physics, Earth & Space, Podcast, The Comprehensive Guide to Science and Faith
Babylonians and Greeks contributed some discoveries and insights that would eventually play into the rise of science. Source
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Brian Keating: Getting Nervous About “Follow the Science”

astrophysicists, Brian Keating, debate, Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, Galileo Galilei, knowledge, Michael Knowles, morality, Physics, Earth & Space, PragerU, Return of the God Hypothesis, rioting, scientists, Stephen Meyer, U.C. San Diego, wisdom
These are EXCELLENT. I would say the themes of all three have to do with the importance of not worshipping scientists or imagining that science is infallible. Source
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Zombie History — Using Galileo to Whack Intelligent Design

Alison Abbott, Andrew Dickson White, Catholic Church, Christianity, climate change, creationism, Discovery Institute, Faith & Science, Galileo Affair, Galileo and the Science Deniers, Galileo Galilei, Heresy, historicity, Inquisition, Intelligent Design, John William Draper, Jonathan Wells, Leaning Tower of Pisa, Mario Livio, Michael Keas, Nature (journal), Nicolaus Copernicus, public schools, religion, science denialism, science deniers, Tychonian model, Unbelievable?, Urban VIII, Warfare Thesis, Zombie Science
A useful myth is hard to put down. The Galileo myth gives a premiere illustration. Ever since John William Draper and Andrew Dickson White fostered the “warfare thesis” of “science vs religion” in the late 19th century, appealing to the Galileo affair as the example par excellence, historians have had little luck convincing the scientific establishment that their version of the Galileo story is flawed. Fortunately, we have the new book by Michael Keas to help set the story straight: Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion. Keas traces the development of the warfare thesis through the 19th century. Despite being largely discredited by historians, the warfare thesis lives on into our time. For instance, Mario Livio has a new book out, Galileo and the…
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The Biggest Myth So Far in Cosmos 3.0 — Baruch Spinoza as Science Hero

Albert Einstein, aliens, ancient Greeks, Aristotle, Baruch Spinoza, Bible, Christiaan Huygens, Christianity, Cosmos 3.0, Evolution News, extraterrestrial life, Faith & Science, Galileo Galilei, geometry, Giordano Bruno, harmonic law, Herwart von Hohenburg, historical errors, Johannes Kepler, Judaism, Michael J. Crowe, Michael Maestlin, National Geographic Channel, nature, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Physics, Earth & Space, planetary motion, Plato, René Descartes, Saint Augustine, The Assayer, Two Books, Unbelievable?
The third season of Cosmos has released four episodes so far, with more to come this Monday, on Fox and the National Geographic channel. Evolution News has commented already, here, here, here, and here. After watching these episodes, I have concluded that the most consequential historical error to correct as yet concerns the treatment of Spinoza in episode one. The series designates Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677) as the next greatest persecuted hero of science after Giordano Bruno (as depicted in Cosmos 2.0; see my video discussion, “Unbelievable Mythbusting: Giordano Bruno Was a Martyr, Yes, but Not for Science”). Although Bruno was burned to death in 1600 for his religious (not scientific) views, the attempted murder of Spinoza, if it occurred, was likely due to a disputed business transaction (not science or…
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