Vindicated But Not Cited: Paper in Nature Heredity Supports Michael Behe’s Devolution Hypothesis

adaptation, Andrew Murray, Current Biology, Darwin Devolves, Darwinian mechanism, devolution, Evolution, function, gene loss, genes, Intelligent Design, John Maynard Smith, loss-of-function mutations, Michael Behe, mutations, natural selection, Nature Heredity, phenotypes, The Quarterly Review of Biology
The literature is looking at the same data that intelligent design proponents are looking at, making similar observations, and asking similar questions. Source
Read More

Scientific Paper Reaffirms New Genes Required for Cambrian Explosion

arthropods, bilateral symmetry, bilaterians, body plans, Cambrian animals, Cambrian Explosion, Cambrian News, Darwin's Doubt, ecological factors, eLife, Evolution, Evolution News, evolutionary biology, fossil record, genes, genetic information, Günter Bechly, Intelligent Design, Nature Communications, orthology, oxygenation, paleontology, Precambrian, Stephen Meyer
The notion that many genes would be required for the Cambrian explosion may seem unsurprising — what is surprising is that anyone would challenge the idea. Source
Read More

Humans Evolving? Armed with the Evidence, the Story Breaks Down

adulthood, aneurysm, artery, Australia, calcification, carpal tunnel syndrome, cosmos, Darwin Devolves, devices, embryonic development, Evolution, evolutionary processes, forearm, genes, gestation, human anatomy, Journal of Anatomy, Michael Behe, natural selection, Origin of Species, regression, regulation, Science Alert, selection pressure, thrombosis, traumatic rupture
Scientists in Australia have uncovered that more adults now possess a “median artery of the forearm,” contrasted with studies over the past two centuries. Source
Read More

Listen: Michael Behe on a Citrate Death Spiral

bacteria, citrate, Darwin Devolves, death rates, E. coli, Evolution, evolutionary theory, genes, genetic information, Long Term Evolution Experiment, Michael Behe, Michigan State University, mutations, novel forms, oxygen
On a new episode of ID the Future, biochemist Michael Behe reviews the Long Term Evolution Experiment (LTEE) at Michigan State, where Richard Lenki’s team was initially excited to see what they thought was a new species forming in their flasks of E. coli. Download the podcast or listen to it here. As Behe has written at Evolution News, one flask of E. coli in Lenski’s experiment evolved the... Source
Read More

Origin Stories — RNA, DNA, and a Dose of Imagination

abiogenesis, breakdown, building blocks, Cambridge University, components, cross-reactions, cytidine, deoxyadenosine, deoxyinosine, DNA, early Earth, Engineering, Evolution, Evolution and Intelligent Design in a Nutshell, genes, genetic alphabet, intelligence, Intelligent Design, naturalism, origin of life, polynucleotides, prebiotic environment, primordial soup, RNA, RNA world, self-driving cars, self-replication, silicon, unguided natural processes, uridine
Editor’s note: Eric Anderson is an attorney, software company executive, and co-author of the recently released book, Evolution and Intelligent Design in a Nutshell.  A new paper in Nature seeks to shed light on life’s origins from non-life on the early Earth, that is, on abiogenesis. Several outlets have picked up the story, including New Scientist. Phys.org explains that the research, led by Cambridge scientists, “shows for the first time how some of the building blocks of both DNA and RNA could have spontaneously formed and co-existed in the ‘primordial soup’ on Earth.” My purpose is not to question the research protocol or the results. No doubt the work is impeccable and the results as described. I am willing to assume that the researchers recreated early Earth conditions and demonstrated…
Read More

Behe Vindicated Again: Sherpas Climb Everest Easier, Because Darwin Devolves

altitude, brown bears, climbing, Daisheng Song, Darwin Devolves, Darwinism, Evolution, genes, genetic information, genome, Han Chinese, hemoglobin, Himalayas, Intelligent Design, interfertility, loss of function, lowlanders, Michael Behe, Mount Everest, mount improbable, natural selection, Nepalese, oxygen, Phd2, PNAS, polar bears, positive selection, seal meat, Sherpa, super-athletes, Tibetans, Wikipedia
How can Tibetans survive high altitudes that leave lowlanders gasping? The answer is found in broken genes. A new paper on the Tibetan genome vindicates what Michael Behe said in Darwin Devolves: evolution breaks things, but sometimes, like in the case of polar bears, the result can allow organisms to thrive in specific environments. Yes, this follows on the heels of last week’s Behe vindication; see here. A team of 16 scientists, writing in PNAS, sought to understand the genetic basis for Tibetan high-altitude adaptation in more detail. Tibetans and Nepalese, many of whom serve as guides for lowlanders wanting to conquer Mount Everest, routinely carry heavy burdens at altitudes above 14,000 feet, the average elevation on the Tibetan plateau. In its entry on Sherpa people, Wikipedia notes, Many Sherpa…
Read More

Episode 4 of Secrets of the Cell — Broken Wolves and other Evolutionary Conundrums

biochemistry, biological information, broken wolves, creative power, DNA, Dogs, E. coli, Evolution, Evolution News, genes, genetic function, Intelligent Design, Michael Behe, mutations, polar bears, Richard Lenski, Secrets of the Cell, wolves
On a new episode of Secrets of the Cell with Michael Behe, the famed biochemist and intelligent design proponent briefly examines several evolutionary icons. These are living species that are considered by Darwinists as slam-dunk evidence of unguided evolution’s creative power, but that turn out to be just the opposite: Dogs, for one, in their great variety descend from wolves. Atheist biologist Richard Dawkins and others have pointed to man’s best friend as confirmation that evolution creatively builds new species. Behe explains, though, that when the cell’s secrets are considered — biological information at the DNA level — we discover that dogs are broken wolves. Of course that doesn’t make them any less loveable. They evolved largely by losing genetic functions through mutation. As Dr. Behe explains, “The mutations don’t…
Read More

New Research on Animal Egg Orientation Shows “Unexpected” Diversity

Christian de Duve, eLife, embryo, embryonic development, Evidence, Evolution, evolutionary plasticity, evolutionary theory, evolutionists, genes, nucleic acids, proteins, unexpected, Urs Schmidt-Ott, Vital Dust, Yoseop Yoon, zygote
When the first cell of an animal — the zygote — divides, it usually has a front end, and a back end, and this orientation will influence how the embryo develops. This orientation is inherited from the egg, where certain gene products are deposited, often at the front end of the egg. These so-called anterior determinants signal the basic, front-back, orientation which is fundamental for the later embryonic development. But as is typical in biology, the specific genes involved often are not conserved across different species. As the summary of recent research explains: With very few exceptions, animals have “head” and “tail” ends that develop when they are an embryo. The genes involved in specifying these ends vary between species and even closely-related animals may use different genes for the…
Read More