New Exhibition on the Bible and Science Opens in Nation’s Capital

Anthony Schmidt, Arno Penzias, Arthur Holly Compton, Bible, biology, Buzz Aldrin, Cambridge University, Catholic priest, Charles Townes, communion, cosmology, Culture, Deborah Haarsma, DNA, Evolution, Faith & Science, Fred Hoyle, Georges Lemaître, Guillermo Gonzalez, humans, Intelligent Design, James Gordon, Jeffrey Williams, Johannes Kepler, John Ray, Leslie Wickman, Melissa Cain Travis, Museum of the Bible, Nancy Pearcey, Nicholas Copernicus, Nobel Prize, On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres, Ota Benga, Pentateuch, Physics, Earth & Space, Psalms, Robert Jastrow, Science and Scripture, Signature in the Cell, St. George Jackson Mivart, Stephen Meyer, The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of Creation, Thinking God’s Thoughts, Total Truth
Tracing the development of science over two millennia, the exhibition challenges a popular misconception about the relationship between the Bible and science. Source
Read More

Intelligent Design and Cosmic Fine-Tuning

A Fortunate Universe, Cosmic Habitable Age, dark energy, earth, expansion rate of universe, fine-timing, fine-tuning, Freeman Dyson, Guillermo Gonzalez, Intelligent Design, Jay Richards, Michael Denton, Moon, Physics, Earth & Space, Privileged Species, Rare Earth, solar system, sun, The Anthropic Cosmological Principle, The Privileged Planet, universe
In combination, the factors mentioned here and in my last two posts constrain the “cosmic habitable age” to narrower dimensions. Source
Read More

Guillermo Gonzalez Extends “Privileged Planet” Arguments to Space Travel

BIO-Complexity, Circumstellar Habitable Zone, earth, Exoplanets, fuel, gravity, Guillermo Gonzalez, Industrial Revolution, Jay Richards, NASA, Peggy Whitson, Physics, Earth & Space, rockets, solar system, space travel, super-earths, The Privileged Planet
As outlined in the book The Privileged Planet, by Guillermo Gonzalez and Jay Richards, the Earth is not only fine-tuned for life, but is also well-designed to allow us to make scientific discoveries. A new BIO-Complexity paper by Guillermo Gonzalez, “The Solar System: Favored for Space Travel,” extends privileged planet arguments to our ability to travel in space. Gonzalez previously summarized some of his arguments here, but it’s worth outlining some of his arguments. Many of the exoplanets that are being discovered are giant “super-earths,” planets with a mass up to 10X Earth’s mass. These planets pose a problem for space travel. As the gravity of a planet increases, so does the amount of fuel that is needed for a rocket to escape the gravity of the planet and reach space. As Gonzalez puts it,…
Read More

Are Cosmic and Planetary Fine-Tuning Constant?

A Fortunate Universe, aaas, catastrophes, Children of Light, cosmic fine-tuning, fusion, Geraint Lewis, Guillermo Gonzalez, habitability, heavy elements, Jay Richards, law of gravity, Luke A. Barnes, Michael Denton, Michael R. Wilczynska, natural constants, Paul Dirac, photosynthesis, physicists, Physics, Earth & Space, planetary fine-tuning, Science Advances, stars, The Privileged Planet, The Wonder of Water
Since Paul Dirac first wrote about the subject of cosmic coincidences in 1937, many physicists have marveled at the specific values of natural constants, such as G, the constant in the law of gravity (6.673×10-11 N m2 kg-2) — an extremely low number. This is an empirical value measured carefully in labs under controlled conditions; it is not derived from equations. One could imagine it taking a different value.  But it is balanced between two catastrophes. If stronger, stars would burn hotter, and photosynthesis would be impossible, and life, if it could exist at all under the crush of gravity, would have to take refuge underground. If gravity were weaker, opposite problems ensue: stars would be unable to start fusion and form heavy elements, and would slowly burn out by…
Read More

“Safe to Question” — Another Graduate of Summer Seminars on Intelligent Design Shares Her Story

Ann Gauger, application, biological complexity, biology, Bruce Gordon, Daniel Reeves, deadline, engineers, graduate students, Guillermo Gonzalez, Intelligent Design, Iron Curtain, John West, mathematicians, Michael Behe, origins of life, Paul Nelson, philosophers, physicians, physicists, professors, Research, Soviet Union, Stephen Meyer, Summer Seminars on Intelligent Design, tipping point, undergraduates, William Dembski
Behind every Iron Curtain is a private network of dissenters, who come out into the light when the curtain falls. That was the case with the old Soviet Union. And so it is in the tightly policed world of evolutionary biology with its “great evolutionary firewall,” guarding against expressions of fundamental doubt about neo-Darwinian theory. Discovery Institute is populating a community of dissenters in academia with the annual all-expenses-paid Summer Seminars on Intelligent Design, to be held this year from July 10 to 18 in Seattle. The application deadline is March 4. Intended for current undergraduate and graduate students plus a few teachers and professors, the Seminars run on two parallel tracks:  The C.S. Lewis Fellows Program on Science and Society; and  The CSC Seminar on Intelligent Design in the…
Read More