Will Laws Protecting the Unborn Endanger Mothers?

abortion, abortionists, Amy Domeyer-Klenske, babies, consent, Dobbs v. Jackson, doctors, eclampsia, ectopic pregnancies, ethics, execution, fetus, health, heart disease, incompetence, Kendra Kolb, killing, Laws, Medicine, mothers, negligence, obstetricians, Roe v. Wade, science, suicide, unborn
A fallacy used by abortionists and their allies is that doctors will be handicapped by having to comply with the law applicable to the care of their patients. Source
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Don’t Forget Scientific Fraud

Anaesthesia (journal), China, Daniele Fanelli, Egypt, fraud, health, India, Iran, Japan, John Carlisle, London School of Economics, Medicine, Netherlands, Reason (magazine), relatives, Research, Richard Smith, science, Science and Engineering Ethics, scientists, South Korea, The BMJ, Turkey
“I’ve done the research. I have the facts.” Thus said two people to me on successive days over the weekend, in almost identical words. Source
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Famed Biologist Jørn Dyerberg Explains His Turn to Intelligent Design

aerobic life, biology, Brian Miller, cell's, citric acid cycle, Darwin's Black Box, Darwinists, fish oil capsules, Greenland, health, heart, ID The Future, Intelligent Design, International Union of Nutrition Scientists, Inuit, Krebs cycle, Medicine, Michael Behe, nutrition, omega-3 fatty acids, Podcast, unguided evolution, University of Copenhagen
If, like me, you’ve got a bottle of fish oil capsules in your refrigerator as a health supplement, you can thank Dr. Dyerberg. Source
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Thomas Aquinas Weighs in on the Coronavirus and Public Policy

Andrew McDiarmid, China, coronavirus, COVID-19, double effect, Evolution News, health, ID The Future, Medicine, neurosurgeon, pandemic, Podcast, policymakers, political calculations, public policy, science, Thomas Aquinas, transparency, WHO
On a new episode of ID the Future, host Andrew McDiarmid speaks with pediatric neurosurgeon and professor Michael Egnor about public policy decisions regarding the coronavirus. Download the podcast or listen to it here. In a conversation based on a recent article for Evolution News, Egnor says scientists should have “stayed in their lane,” giving policymakers the information that science can provide about a potential pandemic, and left the political calculations alone. He argues that WHO failed in one of its primary jobs, which is providing timely information and recommendations for preventing and slowing the spread of pandemics. They sat on information about COVID-19 for weeks, long after they knew there was a serious problem in China. Egnor also urges policymakers to apply science along with other expert information in a…
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