The Paradigm Project — Intelligent Design in a New Light

biological origins, biology, Christianity, cosmology, depression, DNA, documentaries, Douglas Axe, erosion, inspiration, Intelligent Design, isolation, Jonathan Wells, Kutter Callaway, lockdown, non-scientists, paradigm, Personal God, physics, Return of the God Hypothesis, scientists, scripture, Stephen Meyer, suicide rate, The Paradigm Project, theism, Tom Small
Douglas Axe urges scientists to admit there are things they don’t understand about life's origins, much as there are things in Scripture we can’t grasp. Source
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William Dembski on ID, Church Fathers, and a Problem for Atheists

Casey Luskin, Center for Science & Culture, Dallas Conference on Science and Faith, Faith & Science, How to be an Intellectually Fulfilled Atheist (Or Not), ID The Future, Intelligent Design, Jonathan Wells, origin of life, PhD, Podcast, Sean McDowell, The Patristic Understanding of Creation, Understanding Intelligent Design, University of Johannesburg, William Dembski
Let's celebrate the return of Casey Luskin and William Dembski to the intelligent design sphere. Source
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Academic Article Correcting Misconceptions about Evolution Promotes Misconceptions about ID

academic journals, BMC Springer Nature, Brazil, Charles Darwin, creationism, creationists, David Klinghoffer, Discovery Institute, Evolution, Evolution: Education and Outreach, Human Origins, Intelligent Design, Jonathan Wells, lobby groups, Paul Nelson, religious beliefs, scientists
It’s good to be back at Discovery Institute. Even after my fives years away, I see that some things remain unchanged. Source
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Look: On Thanksgiving, Be Grateful for the Intelligent Design of Your Eyes

animals, Cambrian Explosion, Cambrian News, camera eye, Center for Science & Culture, Charles Darwin, compound eyes, COVID-19, Darwinists, Discovery Institute, Evolution, evolutionists, eyes, fossil record, Intelligent Design, Jonathan Wells, lockdown, photon, Rachel Adams, Thanksgiving, trilobite, vertebrate eye, vision, Zombie Science
COVID restrictions may have put a damper on the traditional Thanksgiving celebration. But even lockdowns can't stop us from giving thanks. Source
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On the “Sisyphean Evolution of Darwin’s Finches”

ALX1, American Museum of Natural History, Bailey McKay, Bell Museum, Biological Reviews, Charles Darwin, Darwin's Finches, Evolution, finch beaks, Frank Sulloway, Galápagos Finches series, Galápagos Islands, Geospiza fortis, haplotypes, Jonathan Wells, Katma Award, Michael Behe, morphology, Peter and Rosemary Grant, Robert Zink, Sisyphus, University of Minnesota
Scientific data are followed by the myth: “Finch beak morphology observed on the Galápagos Islands was used by Darwin to formulate his theory of evolution.” Source
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When “Science” Becomes a Cult

abortion, Bill Nye, biology, cult, dogma, double-talk, Douglas Axe, embryology, empirical science, Environmentalism, experimentation, Faith & Science, falsification, human rights, humanities, ideology, John Zmirak, Jonathan Wells, Marquis de Sade, materialistic philosophy, materialistic science, Moses, Nature (journal), nature rights, New Atheism, Pharaoh, political science, Politics, religion, sex, Simone de Beauvoir, The Stream, trust, Twitter, Wesley Smith
The problem comes when, in order to win our acceptance, double-talk is used to pretend that a cult is something other than what it is. Source
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Zombie History — Using Galileo to Whack Intelligent Design

Alison Abbott, Andrew Dickson White, Catholic Church, Christianity, climate change, creationism, Discovery Institute, Faith & Science, Galileo Affair, Galileo and the Science Deniers, Galileo Galilei, Heresy, historicity, Inquisition, Intelligent Design, John William Draper, Jonathan Wells, Leaning Tower of Pisa, Mario Livio, Michael Keas, Nature (journal), Nicolaus Copernicus, public schools, religion, science denialism, science deniers, Tychonian model, Unbelievable?, Urban VIII, Warfare Thesis, Zombie Science
A useful myth is hard to put down. The Galileo myth gives a premiere illustration. Ever since John William Draper and Andrew Dickson White fostered the “warfare thesis” of “science vs religion” in the late 19th century, appealing to the Galileo affair as the example par excellence, historians have had little luck convincing the scientific establishment that their version of the Galileo story is flawed. Fortunately, we have the new book by Michael Keas to help set the story straight: Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion. Keas traces the development of the warfare thesis through the 19th century. Despite being largely discredited by historians, the warfare thesis lives on into our time. For instance, Mario Livio has a new book out, Galileo and the…
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Squid’s Got Talent — Super-Powers Astonish Scientists

Benjamin Burford, bioluminescent organs, camouflage, cuttlefish, Dosidicus gigas, Douglas Axe, environmental clues, Evolution, giant squid, Humboldt squid, innovation, Intelligent Design, Jonathan Wells, Marine Biology Laboratory, Massachusetts, Monterey Bay Aquarium, natural selection, Nature (journal), octopuses, photophores, pigmentation, PNAS, random mutations, remotely-operated vehicle, RNA editing, School of Humanities and Sciences, selective pressure, skin, squid, Stanford University, University of Chicago, visual signals, Walter Myers, Woods Hole
They swim. They shine. They camouflage themselves. The humble squid astonishes scientists with its super-powers. Are these marine champions really the products of random mutations and natural selection? Just saying so is not convincing when you look at the facts. Ranging in size from fingerlings to sea monsters, squid look like visitors from an alien planet. So do the other main groups within cephalopods (“head-foot”), the octopuses and cuttlefish. Those cousins are no less extraordinary, but recent news and research showcase the talent of these amazing creatures. (Note: “squid” can be both singular and plural; as with fish, it’s “one squid, two squid, red squid, blue squid.” But “squids” is acceptable, especially if talking about different species. The size range of squids is enormous, from 10 centimeters to 24 meters!)…
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