Shaw, Scientism, and Darwinism

Androcles and the Lion, Aristophanes, Arms and the Man, Back to Methuselah, Barbara Undershaft, Candida, Charles Dickens, Culture & Ethics, Darwinism, G. K. Chesterton, George Bernard Shaw, Great Britain, Hard Times, Jacques Barzun, John P. Gluck, London, Ludwig van Beethoven, Malcolm Muggeridge, Manchester Guardian, Pygmalion, Russia, Salvation Army, scientism, Shaw Chesterton series, St. Joan, The Restoration of Man, Tom Stoppard, Victorian England
George Bernard Shaw’s positive criterion by which to measure and ridicule folly and vice was fatally ambiguous, eclectic, and inconstant. Source
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That Hideous Strength — C. S. Lewis’s Fantasia of Consciousness at 75

A.D. Nuttall, Abraham Lincoln, Aldous Huxley, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Alfred North Whitehead, Bertrand Russell, Brave New World, Burke, C. P. Snow, Clarence Darrow, Culture & Ethics, Dante, Darwinian theory, David Hume, Deborah Blum, Dickens, Dr. Faustus, E. A. Burtt, Emma Goldman, Evgeny Zamyatin, F. R. Leavis, Frederick Douglass, Friedrich Nietzsche, From Darwin to Hitler, Fyodor Dostoevsky, G. E. M. Anscombe, G. K. Chesterton, Ghost Hunters, Gulag Archipelago, H. L. Mencken, J. D. Bernal, J.B.S. Haldane, Jacques Maritain, Jane Austen, John Dewey, Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., Leszek Kolakowski, Logical Positivists, Lord Acton, Malcolm Muggeridge, Marquis de Sade, Marxists, Max Stirner, metaphysical fiction, Michael Polanyi, Msgr. R.H. Benson, National Institute of Coordinated Experiments, Petrarch, Pierre Duhem, Richard III, Samuel Johnson, Social Darwinism, space-fiction, St. Francis of Assisi, Stanley L. Jaki, Superman, T.S. Eliot, That Hideous Strength, The Alienation of Reason, The Intellectuals and the Masses, The Man Who Was Thursday, The Metaphysical Foundations of Modern Physical Science, The Odyssey, Thomas Carlyle, William Jennings Bryan, William Shakespeare, Yuval Harari
The novel is a narrative, fictional version of a philosophical anatomy of the satanic dimension and implication of much modern history from 1914 onwards. Source
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Michael Aeschliman in National Review — Berlinski Detonates “Fatuous, Flattering” Optimism

Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Ben Shapiro, biology, climate change, coronavirus, Culture & Ethics, ethics, First World War, future, Herbert Butterfield, Homo Deus, Human Nature (book), Incarnation, intellectuals, Ivy League, Jonathan Swift, Law of the Jungle, linguistics, Malcolm Muggeridge, Martin Luther King, mathematics, Michael Aeschliman, Middle East, National Review, philosophy, Reinhold Niebuhr, Steven Pinker, Sunday Special, T.S. Eliot, The Better Angels of Our Nature
From climate change to the coronavirus, one tendency among writers and commentators is to an urgent, insatiable, almost sexual desire to cast unwarranted terror over other people. This tendency is matched by an equal appetite, among a large part of the public, for being terrified. The market is well matched with its suppliers. But this dynamic is mirrored by its opposite: a wish, proceeding from different personal imperatives but no less urgent, to assure us that the future looks better and better, all progress with little pain. There’s a market for this, too, and the relationship with the suppliers is just as tight. It’s to this second pairing that David Berlinski turns his attention in his recent essay collection, Human Nature. Two Celebrity Intellectuals Dr. Berlinski gets a fabulous review…
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