Frontiers of ID: Microscopic Ecologies

agriculture, Amish, asteroids, biology, Clean: The New Science of Skin and the Beauty of Doing Less, Cyanobacteria, Darwinists, ecosystems, Elizabeth Pennisi, fungi, Hayabusa-2, human health, Intelligent Design, James Hamblin, lichen, Mars, Medicine, Michael Eisenstein, microbes, microbiome, mites, Mt. St. Helens, Nature (journal), nematode, pathogens, protists, Ryugu, skin, soap, soil, springtails, tardigrades, Yale University
Public health lecturer James Hamblin at Yale decided to go without showers — for five years! Source
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The “Surprisingly Consistent” Answer to the Question: Are We Alone in the Universe?

a posteriori reasoning, abiogenesis, astrobiology, astronomy, biology, brain, Breakthrough Listen, carbon, consciousness, consensus, Danny C Price, Darwinism, Dyson Sphere, earth, extraterrestrial life, faith, Jeffrey Epstein, Lee Spitler, Macquarie University, Mars, materialism, neuroscience, nitrogen, Orsola De Marco, oxygen, Physics, Earth & Space, science fiction, SETI, starlight, universe
You can understand a lot about modern science if you understand SETI research. Not that SETI is all that sophisticated and certainly not because it’s been successful (it has not), but because it tells you a lot about the materialist metaphysical bias in modern science.  “The Big Question” From The Conversation: Are we alone in the Universe? The expert opinion on that, it turns out, is surprisingly consistent. “Is there other life in the Universe? I would say: probably,” Daniel Zucker, Associate Professor of astronomy at Macquarie University, tells astrophysics student and The Conversation’s editorial intern Antonio Tarquinio on today’s podcast episode. “I think that we will discover life outside of Earth in my lifetime. If not that, then in your lifetime,” says his fellow Macquarie University colleague, Professor Orsola…
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Earth — The Mystery of Our Colorful Home

Apollo 8, Apollo astronauts, beauty, birds of paradise, butterflies, Carl Sagan, color, crystals, Don Davis, earth, Earthrise, emerald, flowers, Frank Borman, gem stones, insects, Io, Jim Lovell, lunar limb, Mars, Moon, natural selection, Neptune, peacock, Physics, Earth & Space, rainbows, reef fish, sexual selection, solar system, space art, surprise, Uranus, Venus
“Oh my God! Look at that picture over there! There’s the Earth coming up! Wow, that’s pretty!” These were the words William Anders spoke to the other two Apollo 8 crew members, Jim Lovell and Frank Borman, just before he took the now famous “earthrise” picture on December 24, 1968. Since then, other Apollo astronauts and even unmanned lunar spacecraft have taken similar pictures (see above). Notice how Anders reacted to the view of Earth rising over the lunar limb; these were obviously spontaneous reactions to something that caught him off guard. He expressed surprise and noted how pretty it looked. These are expressions of beauty. A beautiful thing surprises us. The fact that the earthrise pictures have been reproduced so many times speaks to their universal appeal. Probably most…
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