As Church Membership Slumps Ominously, Time for a Return of the God Hypothesis

agnostics, Bill Nye, Brian Josephson, Christianity, Christians, Christopher Hitchens, church membership, Daniel Dennett, Discovery Institute, Eastern, Faith & Science, Gallup, HarperOne, Intelligent Design, Jews, Lawrence Krauss, materialism, Nobel Prize, Philosophy of Science, polling data, religious belief, Return of the God Hypothesis, Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris, Stephen Hawking, Stephen Meyer, The Federalist, Victor Stenger
"Americans' membership in houses of worship continued to decline last year, dropping below 50% for the first time in Gallup's eight-decade trend." Source
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Charles Darwin in Light of Black History Month

African Americans, Alfred Russel Wallace, Black History Month, Charles Darwin, Culture & Ethics, Darwinism, Darwinists, eugenics, Europeans, Evolution, Francis Galton, ID The Future, indigenous races, Intelligent Design, Jay Richards, Martin Luther King Jr., materialism, scientific racism, sterilization, theology, Victorian England
Was Darwin’s racism purely a function of his time and place, Victorian England? Historian Michael Flannery says no. Source
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Can Natural Reward Theory Save Natural Selection?

alleles, animals, Burgess Shale, Cambrian Explosion, cotton, Darwinian theory, ecosystems, Evolution, foresight, fossil record, John Rust, Macroevolution, materialism, molecular machines, Monopoly, natural selection, Owen M. Gilbert, oxygen, pseudoscience, Rethinking Ecology, selection pressure, teleology, The Origin of Species, Thomas Malthus, University of Texas
An evolutionist dismantles natural selection, then tries to rescue it with his own theory. It won’t work. Source
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Darwinism as Hegelian Dialectics Applied to Biology

act, anti-intellectualism, Aristotle, Artificial Selection, atheists, biological adaptation, biology, captialism, censorship, Communism, Darwinism, eugenics, Evangelical Christians, Evolution, Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed, feudalism, Friedrich Engels, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Hegelian dialectics, Karl Marx, materialism, metaphysics, potency, purpose, synthesis, V.I. Lenin, violence
Nineteenth-century Darwinism was much more than a revolutionary scientific theory. Source
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A College Student Gets Educated on Darwinian “Morality”

Atheism, BBC News, Charles Darwin, chimpanzees, college students, conscience, Culture & Ethics, curriculum, ethics, Evolution, evolutionary ethics, Frans de Waal, God: The Failed Hypothesis, God’s Not Dead, indoctrination, materialism, Michael Egnor, moral relativism, morality, murder, Nicholas Wade, primates, situational ethics, The Descent of Man, Timothy Madigan, Victor Stenger
The student, who attends a public university, is worried about how this kind of indoctrination bodes for the future. I am too. Source
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Lancet Hydroxychloroquine Paper Scandal Illustrates Scientific Bias, Not Only in Medicine

Atheism, censorship, confirmation bias, coronavirus, COVID-19, Donald Trump, Evolution, Evolution News, human evolution, Human Origins, hydroxychloroquine, Indiegogo, James Todaro, Latin America, LinkedIn, Macroevolution, malaria, materialism, Medicine, Michael Behe, Microevolution, Neurodynamics Flow, origin of life, Sapan Desai, scientific culture, Surgisphere, The Guardian, The Lancet, The New England Journal of Medicine, World Health Organization
If you’ve ever wondered how much of high-stakes science is politicized, reflecting the ideological views of the scientists involved despite all their insistences to the contrary, look no further than this. A blockbuster paper in the leading British medical journal, The Lancet, reported increased mortality associated with the “controversial” malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, being tested for use against COVID-19. Why would a malaria drug, of a value that has yet to be determined, be controversial? You already know the answer: it’s because of the identity of the medicine’s biggest cheerleader. He Looked Them Up on LinkedIn In briefest terms, scientists drew on shady data from a previously obscure company, Surgisphere, operated by a skeleton crew with a questionable Internet profile. Having won the approval of the journal’s expert peer reviewers, they…
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