Why Should a Baby Live?

abortion, Alberto Giubilini, babies, Caenorhabditis elegans, Culture & Ethics, Danio rerio, Darwin Day in America, developmental biology, Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila simulans, embryonic age, empirical science, fallopian tube, fertilization, fetus, Francesca Minerva, gastrulation, Haeckel’s embryos, Homo sapiens, human being, humans, identical twins, John West, last menstrual period, Lewis Wolpert, materialistic philosophy, materialistic science, Medicine, monozygotic twins, mother, ovulation, pain, phylotypic stage, Roman Catholicism, zygote
My title is adapted from a 2012 article by two philosophers, Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva. Source
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Famed Biologist Jørn Dyerberg Explains His Turn to Intelligent Design

aerobic life, biology, Brian Miller, cell's, citric acid cycle, Darwin's Black Box, Darwinists, fish oil capsules, Greenland, health, heart, ID The Future, Intelligent Design, International Union of Nutrition Scientists, Inuit, Krebs cycle, Medicine, Michael Behe, nutrition, omega-3 fatty acids, Podcast, unguided evolution, University of Copenhagen
If, like me, you’ve got a bottle of fish oil capsules in your refrigerator as a health supplement, you can thank Dr. Dyerberg. Source
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“Morality Pills”: Ethicist Calls for Drugs to Solve COVID Non-Compliance

bioengineering, bioethics, chemicals, conformity, coronavirus, COVID-19, Culture & Ethics, ethics, Evolution, Friedrich Nietzsche, government mandates, intellectual elites, masks, Medicine, moral enhancement, morality, morality pills, oxytocin, Parker Crutchfield, Racism, teleology, The Conversation, transhumanism, Western Michigan University
Whatever one thinks about government mandates relating to the coronavirus, Parker Crutchfield’s “solution” is worse than the problem. Source
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Suicide by Zoom — Technology and Dehumanization

abortion, assisted suicide, California, coronavirus, Culture & Ethics, dehumanization, Humanize, Medicine, Meera Shah, New York State, oncologists, Oregon, oxymoron, pandemic, patients, Philadelphia Inquirer, Planned Parenthood, silver lining, suicide, Technology, telehealth, telemedicine, Wesley Smith, Zoom
Some have seen a silver lining in the pandemic and welcomed its encouragement of medicine practiced online, potentially freeing doctors to work across state borders, and widening access to care (or virtual care) generally. I’m not sure that’s to be celebrated in its entirety. The trend toward “telehealth” undercuts the crucial personal relationship between doctor and patient, which had already been in retreat before the virus came along. There are other downsides, too, including lethal ones. As the Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “The pandemic is helping U.S. abortion-rights advocates achieve a long-standing goal: Make it easier for women to use pills to end pregnancies up to 10 weeks.” Get your abortion pills online — what could be more convenient? NPR approves, quoting New York physician Meera Shah with Planned Parenthood: “I…
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Lancet Hydroxychloroquine Paper Scandal Illustrates Scientific Bias, Not Only in Medicine

Atheism, censorship, confirmation bias, coronavirus, COVID-19, Donald Trump, Evolution, Evolution News, human evolution, Human Origins, hydroxychloroquine, Indiegogo, James Todaro, Latin America, LinkedIn, Macroevolution, malaria, materialism, Medicine, Michael Behe, Microevolution, Neurodynamics Flow, origin of life, Sapan Desai, scientific culture, Surgisphere, The Guardian, The Lancet, The New England Journal of Medicine, World Health Organization
If you’ve ever wondered how much of high-stakes science is politicized, reflecting the ideological views of the scientists involved despite all their insistences to the contrary, look no further than this. A blockbuster paper in the leading British medical journal, The Lancet, reported increased mortality associated with the “controversial” malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, being tested for use against COVID-19. Why would a malaria drug, of a value that has yet to be determined, be controversial? You already know the answer: it’s because of the identity of the medicine’s biggest cheerleader. He Looked Them Up on LinkedIn In briefest terms, scientists drew on shady data from a previously obscure company, Surgisphere, operated by a skeleton crew with a questionable Internet profile. Having won the approval of the journal’s expert peer reviewers, they…
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