Old Wine in New Bottles: How Darwin Recruited Malthus to Fortify a Failed Idea from Antiquity

abiogenesis, Alphonse de Candolle, Aristotle, atheists, atomism, Charles Bradlaugh, Charles Darwin, Charles Lyell, Christianity, complexification, David Hume, Edward Aveling, Epicurus, Erasmus Darwin, Evolution, Friedrich Engels, Georges Cuvier, Gertrude Himmelfarb, Greece, Homo sapiens, Intelligent Design, Karl Marx, Law of Correlation, Lucretius, Matthew Arnold, Middle Ages, natural selection, Origin of Species, Patrick Matthew, Plato, Poor Law, Rome, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas Malthus, transhumanism, Unmoved Mover, Victorian England, William Paley
It was undoubtedly a tremendous philosophical coup for Darwin whose knowledge of formal philosophy was limited. Source
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Denton: Return of the Man Hypothesis

anthropocentrism, biology, bipeds, Charles Darwin, Chemistry, cosmos, Eric Anderson, Evolution, fine-tuning, fire, ID The Future, Intelligent Design, Michael Denton, Middle Ages, natural selection, Physics, Earth & Space, physiology, Podcast, Return of the God Hypothesis, Stephen Meyer, Technology, The Miracle of Man
Scientific discoveries have revitalized the outlook that placed man at the center of the cosmos, not in a physical but in a metaphysical sense. Source
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Michael Denton Identifies TWO Intelligent Designs in the Universe

Big Bang, biology, carbon, Chemistry, consciousness, Discovery Institute, fine-tuning, fitness, Francis Bacon, Intelligent Design, life, mankind, medieval synthesis, Michael Denton, Middle Ages, mind, nature, organs, physics, Reconquista, The Fitness of Nature for Mankind, The Miracle of the Cell
“The whole world works together in the service of man,” as Francis Bacon wrote. Denton revives this ancient insight with modern rigor. Source
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Weekend Reading: Heretics and Inquisitors

BioEssays, censorship, creationism, crime, Culture, Darwinists, Douglas Axe, establishment, Evolution News, free speech, Günter Bechly, Heresy, history, Inquisition, Intelligent Design, Italy, Middle Ages, mystery, novels, Politics, Richard Sternberg, The Name of the Rose, Umberto Eco, William of Baskerville
Years ago, reading Umberto Eco’s novel The Name of the Rose, I got bogged down early on and stopped. Rereading it now, I can’t imagine what I found boring. It’s great! A learned crime-mystery about murders in a 14th-century Italian abbey, it deals in part with the relationship between heretics and inquisitors. What Eco relates (via his protagonist William of Baskerville) has a lot of contemporary relevance. Intelligent design is a heresy against the backdrop of conformist evolutionary thinking, and ID proponents must ever beware of Darwinist inquisitors. (See the recent threat of censorship from the biology journal BioEssays.) Eco observes that inquisitions generate heretics, rather than stamping them out. That is true. Many of the leading ID scientists (Axe, Sternberg, Bechly, and others) came to us because they were…
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