Great Expectations: Origins in Science Education

abiogenesis, Arkansas Tech University, atmosphere, college students, Dark Ages, Discovery Institute Press, DNA, early Earth, Education, Evolution and Intelligent Design in a Nutshell, high school students, information, James Tour, John Narcum, Miller-Urey experiment, molecular machines, origin of life, polymers, primordial soup, ribosomes, RNA world, The Mystery of Life’s Origin
How ironic then that a majority of college-educated adults have been led so far astray in their understanding of the sobering realities of abiogenesis research. Source
Read More

Can Natural Reward Theory Save Natural Selection?

alleles, animals, Burgess Shale, Cambrian Explosion, cotton, Darwinian theory, ecosystems, Evolution, foresight, fossil record, John Rust, Macroevolution, materialism, molecular machines, Monopoly, natural selection, Owen M. Gilbert, oxygen, pseudoscience, Rethinking Ecology, selection pressure, teleology, The Origin of Species, Thomas Malthus, University of Texas
An evolutionist dismantles natural selection, then tries to rescue it with his own theory. It won’t work. Source
Read More

“Resolution Revolution”: Intelligent Design, Now at the Atomic Level

adaptive optics, angstroms, atoms, ATP synthase, bacterial flagellum, biological systems, Boston University, Chemistry, Cryo-EM microscopy, Daniel Hammer, diffraction limit, electron microscope, Food and Drug Administration, Intelligent Design, Jed Macosco, Jiulia He, John E. Walker, Journal of the American Chemical Society, Leonhard Möckl, Methods in Molecular Biology, Michael Behe, microglia, microscopy, mitochondria, molecular machines, Nature News and Views, Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, neuroscience, Nobel Prize, ophthalmology, optical coherence tomography, optical engineers, PNAS, Protein Science (journal), ribose operon, rotors, Sheng Xiao, Stanford University, W. E. Moerner
Breakthroughs in imaging are allowing scientists to see iconic molecular machines in unprecedented detail. This will be a great boon for design science. Source
Read More

Is Fine-Tuning “More Extreme” in Biology or Cosmology?

biology, career destruction, censors, censorship, Chemistry, cosmology, creator, Darwinists, Douglas Axe, fine-tuning, Intelligent Design, John Stonestreet, Journal of Theoretical Biology, Michael Denton, molecular machines, Ola Hössjer, physics, Physics, Earth & Space, rebuttal, reputation, Return of the God Hypothesis, specified complexity, Steinar Thorvaldsen, Stephen Meyer, The Miracle of the Cell, water, William Dembski
As authors Thorvaldsen and Hössjer say, “Biology is inherently more complicated than the large-scale universe and so fine-tuning is even more a feature.” Source
Read More

New Research Finds Molecular Machines Are Even More Amazing than Behe Realized

ATP synthase, bacterial flagellum, bucket brigade, catalysis, cryo-electron microscopy, Darwinian evolution, dimers, drive shaft, enzymes, FliD proteins, Grotthus mechanism, hook, imaging techniques, Institute of Science and Technology, Intelligent Design, Irreducible Complexity, John E. Walker, Leonid Sazanov, lipid bilayer, Michael Behe, molecular machines, Nature Communications, Nobel Prize, PNAS, Scott Minnich, Unlocking the Mystery of Life, vibrations, water molecules
With better imaging and analysis techniques, details about icons of design are coming into clearer focus. The icons are looking better than ever. Source
Read More

Journal Prints “Intelligent Design”! But…

AAA proteins, ATP, ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities, blind watchmaker, centrosomes, computers, cytoplasm, Darwin-skeptics, Darwinian evolution, dynein, endoplasmic reticulum, Evolution, Golgi complex, homology, humans, Intelligent Design, Irreducible Complexity, J.C. Phillips, kinesin, Maxwell’s demon, Michael Behe, molecular machines, natural selection, proteins, Richard Feynman, Rutgers University, self-organized networks, slime molds, Stephen Jay Gould, worms
You’re not likely to see the phrase “intelligent design” in any typical science journal, except to mock it. A recent example by a doctrinaire evolutionist is, not surprisingly, intended to subvert the design inference for a molecular machine. Did his intention backfire? Read on. J.C. Phillips is a physicist at Rutgers University who has taken an interest in the concept of “self-organized criticality,” something that sounds as credible as “unguided excellence.” Phillips believes that unintelligent Darwinian natural selection moves molecular machines toward optimum performance. It’s kind of like how computers and other technology get more and more sophisticated the longer you leave them left outside to be buffeted by wind, rain, and ice storms. In his recent paper in PNAS, he takes on a marvelous walking machine, dynein, to illustrate…
Read More

Hey, Paul Davies — Your ID is Showing

Barbara McClintock, chaos, cosmology, Discovery Institute, engineers, Eva Jablonka, intelligence, Intelligent Design, James Clerk Maxwell, James Shapiro, John Cairns, Maxwell’s demon, molecular machines, motors, nanotechnology, natural genetic engineering, order, origin of information, origin of life, Paul Davies, Physics, Earth & Space, rotors, Second Law of Thermodynamics, Stephen Meyer, The Demon in the Machine
Editor’s note: Dr. Shedinger is a Professor of Religion at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa. He is the author of a recent book critiquing Darwinian triumphalism, The Mystery of Evolutionary Mechanisms. No better advertisements for intelligent design exist than works written by establishment scientists that unintentionally make design arguments. I can think of few better examples than well-known cosmologist Paul Davies’s recently published book The Demon in the Machine: How Hidden Webs of Information Are Solving the Mystery of Life (2019). With a nod toward James Clerk Maxwell’s entropy-defying demon, Davies argues that the gulf between physics and biology is completely unbridgeable without some fundamentally new concept. Since living organisms consistently resist the ravages of entropy that all forms of inanimate matter are subject to, there must be some non-physical principle allowing living…
Read More

Michael Behe on the Design Idea That Won’t Go Away (and Shouldn’t)

Charles Darwin, Darwin's Black Box, Del Ratzsch, Evolution, evolutionary mechanism, Intelligent Design, Irreducible Complexity, Jonathan Witt, Michael Behe, molecular machines, Podcast
On a new episode of ID the Future, Jonathan Witt catches up with Darwin’s Black Box author and biochemist Michael Behe at the 2020 Dallas Conference on Science & Faith, where the two discuss an idea that many wish would just go away, but hasn’t. Download the podcast or listen to it here. Charles Darwin himself told us how his evolutionary theory could be overturned: identify a biological system that couldn’t possibly have evolved by “numerous success successive slight modifications.” It’s to Darwin’s credit that he put his theory in “empirical harm’s way,” to quote philosopher Del Ratzsch. But as Witt and Behe note, Darwin also cleverly placed the burden of proof on his opponents, an arguably dubious maneuver given that his proposed evolutionary mechanism has never once been observed…
Read More