Sleep on It: Design in the Subconscious Brain

birds, circadian clock, Darwinism, Ernst Haeckel, evolutionists, firefighters, fruit flies, functional information, humans, infants, insects, Intelligent Design, mammals, natural selection, neural signaling, neurons, Neuroscience & Mind, NREM, phylogeny, rapid eye movement, rats, reptiles, roundworms, Science Advances, sleep, zebra finches
An international team reasoned there had to be a purpose for sleep. In one of the largest datasets ever collected, they believe they found two functions. Source
Read More

Reform It Altogether — More on the Naturalistic Parabola

adaptive biological complexity, Ann Gauger, biology, Calvin College, Christianity, complex systems, design triangulation, Discovery Institute, Evolution, evolutionary biology, functional analysis, hamlet, Intelligent Design, Macroevolution, Michael Lynch, Michael Scriven, natural selection, naturalism, Naturalistic Parabola, Rob Koons, Stephen Meyer, Summer Seminar, Wayne State University, William Dembski
I’ve fussed about this point for a long time. And Discovery Institute colleagues have occasionally chided me for my obsession. Source
Read More

Ignoring the Obvious: Convergent Evolution in Strickberger’s Evolution

adaptive challenges, Benedikt Hallgrimsson, biology, Brian K. Hall, convergence, convergent evolution, Darwinism, engineer, Ernst Mayr, Evolution, flowering plants, Francois Jacob, George Ledyard Stebbins, natural selection, neo-Darwinian theory, parallelism, plant evolution, Simon Conway Morris, St. George Jackson Mivart, Strickberger’s Evolution, textbooks, The Origin of Species, tinkerer, What Evolution Is
Remarkably, even Ernst Mayr was forced to tacitly acknowledge the challenge to Darwinism posed by convergence. Source
Read More

To Avoid Debate, Darwinists at the AAAS Would Even Censor…Darwin

Adam Sedgwick, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Biological Sciences section, business meeting, Cambridge University, Charles Darwin, David Burgess, Evolution, free speech, Harvard University, Herman Bouma, Karl Nageli, Louis Agassiz, National Science Teaching Association, natural selection, neo-Darwinian evolution, pedagogy, professors, students, teachers, The Origin of Species, Vicki Chandler
A modest proposal to teach evolution the way Darwin treated his own theory has “no support” from one of the world’s most powerful scientific organizations. Source
Read More

James Dwight Dana: Falsely Claimed Darwinist

Alfred Russel Wallace, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Journal of Science, Charles Darwin, Darwin Industry, Darwinian evolution, Darwinian theism, Encyclopedia Britannica, Evolution, evolutionary theory, Faith & Science, Geological Society of America, Geology, intelligent evolution, James Dwight Dana, Manual of Geology, mineralogy, National Academy of Sciences, natural selection, Scientific community, Spam Risk, theistic evolution, Uncategorized, William F. Sanford Jr.
When it comes to claims of the “nearly unanimous” acceptance of Darwinian evolution, mere assertion cannot stand as fact. Source
Read More

Biologist Robert Waltzer on Evolutionary Theory’s Room for Humility

Andrew McDiarmid, common descent, dialogue, Discovery Institute Press, epistemological humility, Evolution, Evolution and Intelligent Design in a Nutshell, evolutionary theory, ID The Future, Intelligent Design, natural selection, Robert Waltzer
On a new episode of ID the Future, biologist Robert Waltzer talks with host Andrew McDiarmid about Professor Waltzer’s chapter in the new Discovery Institute Press volume, Evolution and Intelligent Design in a Nutshell. Download the podcast or listen to it here. Waltzer’s chapter covers some key terms in the evolution/ID debate that are often misunderstood or misused. These include the word “evolution” itself, “change over time,” “common descent,” and “natural selection.” He offers quick definitions and explains some of the confusion surrounding them. Waltzer also describes an encouraging success story of his about fostering open dialogue and exploration of the evidence for design in nature.  The post Biologist Robert Waltzer on Evolutionary Theory’s Room for Humility appeared first on Evolution News.
Read More

Evolutionary Theorizing Depends on Magic Words

AARS, Amber Dance, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, automobile, cancer, chassis, crankshaft, Darwinians, engine, enzymes, Evolution, golf, illusion, Journal of Molecular Evolution, magic words, magicians, messenger RNA, natural selection, protein synthesis, rabbits, Richard Dawkins, Robert Shapiro, Scientific American, seats, steering wheel, The Scientist, Tokyo Institute of Science
Here is a quick tale about the evolution of the automobile. Billions of years ago, a chassis appeared.The chassis acquired an engine.The crankshaft found a side gig as a steering wheel.The steering wheel linked up with the brake pedal to form a universal joint.Seats developed. They probably arose when the first hood evolved. Now consider leading journals publishing this account after it has whisked through peer review. Is this not exactly what goes on in evolutionary theorizing? Darwinians have mastered the use of magic words that replace rigor with imagination. And they get away with it; nobody ever blows the whistle on what should be tagged a major scientific foul.  New Findings About Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases Here is an example in The Scientist, a news magazine for working scientists who should…
Read More

Behe Vindicated Again: Sherpas Climb Everest Easier, Because Darwin Devolves

altitude, brown bears, climbing, Daisheng Song, Darwin Devolves, Darwinism, Evolution, genes, genetic information, genome, Han Chinese, hemoglobin, Himalayas, Intelligent Design, interfertility, loss of function, lowlanders, Michael Behe, Mount Everest, mount improbable, natural selection, Nepalese, oxygen, Phd2, PNAS, polar bears, positive selection, seal meat, Sherpa, super-athletes, Tibetans, Wikipedia
How can Tibetans survive high altitudes that leave lowlanders gasping? The answer is found in broken genes. A new paper on the Tibetan genome vindicates what Michael Behe said in Darwin Devolves: evolution breaks things, but sometimes, like in the case of polar bears, the result can allow organisms to thrive in specific environments. Yes, this follows on the heels of last week’s Behe vindication; see here. A team of 16 scientists, writing in PNAS, sought to understand the genetic basis for Tibetan high-altitude adaptation in more detail. Tibetans and Nepalese, many of whom serve as guides for lowlanders wanting to conquer Mount Everest, routinely carry heavy burdens at altitudes above 14,000 feet, the average elevation on the Tibetan plateau. In its entry on Sherpa people, Wikipedia notes, Many Sherpa…
Read More

Book Excerpt: A Factory That Builds Factories That Build Factories That…

abiogenesis, bacteria, Charles Darwin, Darwinian evolution, early Earth, factories, Gerald F. Joyce, Harvard University, Holy Grail, Intelligent Design, Jack Szostak, Joseph Hooker, Max Schultze, metabolic pathways, molecules, National Public Radio, natural selection, origin of life, Oxford University, protoplasm, random mutations, Richard Dawkins, self-replication, The Origin of Species, The Selfish Gene
Editor’s note: The following is an excerpt from the the new book from Discovery Institute Press, Evolution & Intelligent Design in a Nutshell. Eric H. Anderson is a lawyer, software engineering executive, and writer on intelligent design. Nobel Prize recipient and Harvard origin-of-life researcher Jack Szostak once remarked, “In my lab, we’re interested in the transition from chemistry to early biology on the early earth…. You want something that can grow and divide and, most importantly, exhibit Darwinian evolution.”1 Another noted origin-of-life researcher, Gerald F. Joyce, says much the same thing. When asked about the idea that chemicals might have come together on the early Earth to form something that could copy itself, Joyce responded, “That’s what we and others are interested in because that’s sort of, you know, the…
Read More

Journal Prints “Intelligent Design”! But…

AAA proteins, ATP, ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities, blind watchmaker, centrosomes, computers, cytoplasm, Darwin-skeptics, Darwinian evolution, dynein, endoplasmic reticulum, Evolution, Golgi complex, homology, humans, Intelligent Design, Irreducible Complexity, J.C. Phillips, kinesin, Maxwell’s demon, Michael Behe, molecular machines, natural selection, proteins, Richard Feynman, Rutgers University, self-organized networks, slime molds, Stephen Jay Gould, worms
You’re not likely to see the phrase “intelligent design” in any typical science journal, except to mock it. A recent example by a doctrinaire evolutionist is, not surprisingly, intended to subvert the design inference for a molecular machine. Did his intention backfire? Read on. J.C. Phillips is a physicist at Rutgers University who has taken an interest in the concept of “self-organized criticality,” something that sounds as credible as “unguided excellence.” Phillips believes that unintelligent Darwinian natural selection moves molecular machines toward optimum performance. It’s kind of like how computers and other technology get more and more sophisticated the longer you leave them left outside to be buffeted by wind, rain, and ice storms. In his recent paper in PNAS, he takes on a marvelous walking machine, dynein, to illustrate…
Read More