Subduction and the “Mechanism” of Intelligent Design

Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Archean Eon, crustal material, diapirs, early Earth, geologists, Geology, inference to design, Intelligent Design, lithosphere, mechanism, mélange rocks, nature, Nature Communications, Neoproterozoic Era, plate tectonics, subduction, subduction zones
We can see plenty of evidence that intelligent design in nature is real, but it’s not always clear exactly how that design is instantiated in nature. Source
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What Subduction Teaches About Intelligent Design

carbon, chalk, continental crust, erosion, Great Oxidation Event, Intelligent Design, limestone, mantle, Michael Denton, Nature Communications, Nature Geoscience, nitrogen, oceanic crust, oceanic sediments, phosphorous, plate tectonics, scientific papers, solar system, subduction, sulfur, The Wonder of Water, volcanos
My PhD research was on the early plate tectonic history on earth. Plate tectonics involves the movement of plates on the surface of the earth. Source
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Sorry, Origin-of-Life Researchers, But Bubbles Are Not Cells

Aleksandr Oparin, Alexander Marras, Ann Gauger, Argonne National Laboratory, bubbles, Charles Thaxton, Chemistry, coacervates, Darwinian theory, Dean Matthew Tirrell, Elena dos Santos, Encyclopedia Britannica, Evolution, Frankenstein, Geppetto, Illustra Media, Intelligent Design, Marxists, Nature (journal), Nature Communications, origin of life, Penn State, Pinocchio, replication, RNA, RNA world, Sam Sholtis, Sidney Fox, Signature in the Cell, Stephen Meyer, The Mystery of Life’s Origin, University of Basel, University of Chicago
Oparin is back. Some origin-of-life researchers are using his coacervate theory without giving him credit or realizing they are retreading dead-end ideas. Source
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Scientific Paper Reaffirms New Genes Required for Cambrian Explosion

arthropods, bilateral symmetry, bilaterians, body plans, Cambrian animals, Cambrian Explosion, Cambrian News, Darwin's Doubt, ecological factors, eLife, Evolution, Evolution News, evolutionary biology, fossil record, genes, genetic information, Günter Bechly, Intelligent Design, Nature Communications, orthology, oxygenation, paleontology, Precambrian, Stephen Meyer
The notion that many genes would be required for the Cambrian explosion may seem unsurprising — what is surprising is that anyone would challenge the idea. Source
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New Research Finds Molecular Machines Are Even More Amazing than Behe Realized

ATP synthase, bacterial flagellum, bucket brigade, catalysis, cryo-electron microscopy, Darwinian evolution, dimers, drive shaft, enzymes, FliD proteins, Grotthus mechanism, hook, imaging techniques, Institute of Science and Technology, Intelligent Design, Irreducible Complexity, John E. Walker, Leonid Sazanov, lipid bilayer, Michael Behe, molecular machines, Nature Communications, Nobel Prize, PNAS, Scott Minnich, Unlocking the Mystery of Life, vibrations, water molecules
With better imaging and analysis techniques, details about icons of design are coming into clearer focus. The icons are looking better than ever. Source
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Make Like a Scorpion, and Other Arachnid Designs

amebocytes, American Chemical Society, arachnids, Australia, cancer, cephalothorax, City of Hope Cancer Center, daddy-longlegs, death stalker, Delaware, dragline silk, horseshoe crabs, Huwentoxin-IV, immunotherapy, Intelligent Design, Journal of Natural Products, Jurgen Otto, Limulus Amebocyte Lysate, mating season, mites, Nature Communications, peacock spiders, pedipalps, scorpions, spider web, spider-silk, spiders, Tachypleus gigas, tarantulas, ticks, toxins, University of Melbourne, University of Queensland, venom, β-sheet
Arachnids (a class of invertebrate arthropods, most with six pairs of appendages, of which four are usually for locomotion) make up some of the scariest creepy-crawlies to most people. The class includes spiders, daddy-longlegs, mites, ticks, scorpions, and horseshoe crabs. They have simple eyes, unlike the compound eyes of most insects. Also different from insects, arachnids have a fused head and thorax (the cephalothorax) and abdomen; the cephalothorax is often covered by a hard carapace.  The first pair of appendages in spiders, the pedipalps, help hold prey; in scorpions, they act as pincers. Lacking jaws, spiders suck the juice out of their prey and discard the exoskeleton. Some hunting spiders have exceptional vision, with eight eyes looking in all directions. Horseshoe crabs, only recently added to the class of arachnids…
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More Hints of Order in the Genome

Abo1, Amir Bitran, ATP, biochemistry, Biozentrum, Caulobacter crescentus, central dogma, Chelsea R. Bulock, chromosomes, cohesin, cotranslational folding, Darwinian mechanism, DNA, E. coli, error catastrophe, genome, GGC, GGU, Intelligent Design, Junk DNA, Lego blocks, misfolding, mRNA, Nature Communications, Patricia Clark, PNAS, polymerase, polypeptides, Polδ, proofreader, proteins, RNA, South Korea, strand breaks, UNIST, University of Basel, University of Notre Dame, University of Seville, William Paley
Genomics has come a long way since the central dogma (the notion that DNA is the master controller that calls all the shots) and junk DNA (the expectation that much of the genome is non-functional). If scientists ditch those old dogmas and approach the genome expecting to find reasons for things, they often do. Synonymous Mutations To-may-to or to-mah-to? The British write flavour; the Americans write flavor, but generally each understands the other without too much difficulty. Genomes, too, have alternate ways of spelling things: GGU and GGC in messenger RNA both spell glycine. No big deal, thought geneticists; these “silent” mutations cause no change in the resulting protein. At the University of Notre Dame, however, biochemists are finding that the differences in spelling are not just background noise; they…
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Did Cloudinids Have the Guts to Be Worms?

Acuticocloudina, bilaterian animals, bilaterian worms, Cambrian Explosion, Cambrian News, Cambrian Small Shelly Fauna, Chengjiang biota, China, Cloudina, cloudinids, cloudinomorphs, cnidarian, Conotubus, Costatubus, Darwinian evolution, Dickinsonia, digestive tract, Ediacaran biota, Ediacaran Period, Ediacaran Small Shelly Fauna, Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary, Evolution, Feiyanella, Germany, GUT, James D. Schiffbauer, Multiconotubus, Nature Communications, Nevada, polyp, Rajatubulus, Saarina, sessile filter feeder, Sinotubulites, skeleton, University of Missouri, Wood Canyon Formation
In my Evolution News article “Why Dickinsonia Was Most Probably Not an Ediacaran Animal” (Bechly 2019), I promised last year to follow up on other alleged Ediacaran animals. Now is a good moment to come back to this, because a new study has just been published in the journal Nature Communications by Schiffbauer et al. (2020), who identify a problematic Ediacaran shelly fossil as a bilateral animal most likely related to annelid worms. The crucial evidence is the alleged preservation of a digestive tract, which would also represent the oldest fossil record for this organ system (Stann 2020). The new fossil is considered to be a close relative of the genus Cloudina, which is a globally distributed Ediacaran index fossil first described by Germs (1972). It represents one of the…
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