Intelligent Design in Animal Self-Location and Navigation

algorithms, Animal Algorithms, bats, behavior, biology, circuits, electronic circuit, Engineering, fish, grid cells, head-direction cells, hindbrain, hippocampus, homeostasis, information, Intelligent Design, Life Sciences, mammals, navigation, neural network, neurons, optical flow, place cells, proximate neurons, Research, science, self, zebrafish
A question is whether such mechanisms exist in more ancient brain regions of other animals. A new study has identified a self-location mechanism in zebrafish. Source
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How Frogs and Fish “Count”

algebra, ants, Brian Butterworth, calculus, Can Fish Count?, common ancestor, croaks, dyscalculia, fish, frogs, Gary Rose, geometry, humans, Intelligent Design, mathematics, neurons, neuroscience, Neuroscience & Mind, number sense, numbers, pallium, Psyche (journal), respiratory fitness, túngara frog, zebrafish
We’re beginning to find out more about how animals that don’t really “think” much can keep track of numbers, when needed. Source
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Can Red Have “Redness” if No Self Perceives It?

apes, chimpanzees, Closer to Truth, genomes, human exceptionalism, illusion, inner feeling, Julian Baggini, lichens, neurons, neuroscience, Neuroscience & Mind, origin of life, philosophy, qualia, red, redness, religion, Robert Lawrence Kuhn, rocks, science, scientific explanation, self
Is not the fact that we are having these discussions the best available evidence that we are not “just overgrown apes or undergrown apes”? Source
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Yes, Ants Think — Like Computers

Agouti, agriculture, algorithm, ant colony, antennae, anternet, ants, Bert Hölldobler, biology, brains, capybara, castes, cities, computer, computer programmers, consensus-building, Deborah M. Gordon, division of labor, E. O. Wilson, eggs, evolutionary biologists, foraging, humans, Intelligent Design, language, larvae, leafcutter ants, mammals, neurons, neuroscience, Neuroscience & Mind, pheromones, pupae, slavery, Stanford University, superorganism, territorial wars, The Superorganism
Computer programmers have adapted some ant problem-solving methods to software programs (but without the need for complex chemical scents). Source
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Are Birds Really Smarter than Reptiles?

animal behavior, babies, birds, brain size, brain volume, cognitive capacity, Cornell University, cuckoo, Diane Colombelli-Négrel, eggs, facial recognition, fairy wrens, intelligence, Intelligent Design, lemurs, lizards, Malurus cyaneus, neurons, Neuroscience & Mind, Pavel Němec, penguins, reptiles, The Scientist
Scientists clash over how to measure animal intelligence: brain volume, brain organization, numbers of neurons…? Source
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Navigation Ability Crosses Phylum Lines — And That’s a Problem for Evolution

algorithms, Angular Head Velocity, Animal Algorithms, ants, backtracking, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, calculus, Cambrian phyla, casting, Darwinian theory, Eric Cassell, goldfish, hardware, Intelligent Design, Irreducible Complexity, Life Sciences, mammals, Nature (journal), Nature Communications Biology, navigation, Neuron (journal), neurons, olfaction, phyla, PNAS, Sainsbury Wellcome Centre, sea turtles, software, University of Toronto
Yes, that is kind of adorable. It took only a few days for the fish to learn to drive. Source
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Verdicts of “Poor Design” in Biology Don’t Have a Good Track Record

"poor design", An Introduction to Systems Biology, ARF, bioengineering, biological information, biology, Darwinian processes, diarrhea, Erez Ribak, Erika DeBenedictis, gut bacteria, INK4a, Intelligent Design, MIT, Müller cells, natural selection, neurons, optic nerve, photoreceptors, physiology, random mutation, Technion, TEDx talk, Uri Alon, vertebrate eye, vestigial organs
For years people cited the wiring of the vertebrate eye as evidence of “poor design” in biology. Source
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Sleep on It: Design in the Subconscious Brain

birds, circadian clock, Darwinism, Ernst Haeckel, evolutionists, firefighters, fruit flies, functional information, humans, infants, insects, Intelligent Design, mammals, natural selection, neural signaling, neurons, Neuroscience & Mind, NREM, phylogeny, rapid eye movement, rats, reptiles, roundworms, Science Advances, sleep, zebra finches
An international team reasoned there had to be a purpose for sleep. In one of the largest datasets ever collected, they believe they found two functions. Source
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Design on Time — Paley’s Watch Was Inside Him

biological clock, blood pressure, chronotype variation, circadian clock, clocks, Cyanobacteria, Harvard Medical School, imaging tools, Intelligent Design, Japan, jet lag, KaiC, mammalian locomotor activity, Nagoya University, Nature (journal), Nature Scientific Reports, neurons, PLOS ONE, PNAS, rats, sleep, suprachiasmatic nucleus, Synechococcus elongatus, University of Illinois, University of Rochester, William Paley
Watches are everywhere on the heath. Look up, look down, look inside; biology runs on time. Source
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