Something Is Missing from Bronx Zoo’s Apology

African-American history, Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, American Eugenics Society, Black Lives Matter, Bronx Zoo, Civic Biology, Cristián Samper, Culture & Ethics, Darwinian evolution, Discovery Institute, eugenics, Evolution, evolutionary science, Fox News, George Floyd, Henry Fairfield Osborn, Human Zoos, Igorot, John West, Madison Grant, Monkey Zoo, multiplication table, New York Times, Ota Benga, Philippines, pseudoscientific racism, pygmy, Robin DiAngelo, Seattle, The Passing of the Great Race, University of Washington, White Fragility, Wildlife Conservation Society
The truth is that placing a man in the Monkey House was intended as an education for the public in Darwinian evolution. Source
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Bari Weiss Knows What ID Scientists Already Knew

academia, Bari Weiss, biology, canaries, censorship, Darwinism, discrimination, dissent, Douglas Axe, eric hedin, Evolution, Free Science, free speech, Granville Sewell, Günter Bechly, hostile work environment, Intelligent Design, journalists, Michael Egnor, New York Times, Richard Sternberg, scientists, Scott Minnich, self-censorship, Smithsonian Institution, thunderdome
Advocates of intelligent design have experienced the lengths to which upholders of the “predetermined narrative” will go to punish dissent. Source
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Elk Goes Down; Darwin Breathes a Sigh of Relief

abolitionist movement, Afghan Hound, Black Lives Matter, Border Collie, Bronx Zoo, Charles Darwin, Christians, civil rights, Creativity, Darwinists, dominance, elk, Evolution, Human Zoos, John West, Judeo-Christian tradition, New York Times, Oregon, Ota Benga, pastors, Portland, priests, protesters, pseudoscience, racial hierarchy, Racism, scientific racism, scripture, statues, Wesley Smith
What is the evolutionary argument against unapologetic racism and the supremacy of whatever race can climb to the top? Source
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Human Zoos — How “Science” Fueled the Racial Fire

African-American, Africans, alt-right, Bellevue, Black Lives Matter, Bronx Zoo, Caucasian, Charles Darwin, clergy, Culture & Ethics, Discovery Institute, Evolution, George Floyd, Human Zoos, John West, lockdown, looting, Minneapolis, New York City, New York Times, original sin, Ota Benga, pandemic, police brutality, protests, pygmies, Racism, scientific racism, Seattle, South Bronx, St. Louis, textbooks, The Descent of Man, The Hub, Tukwila, United States, Wesley Smith
Scorching images from across the country fill our screens, a reminder that the racial past remains an unhealed burn in America’s present. The mood in our own area is shocked and anxious, as we watched violence and looting spread from Seattle to outlying cities like Bellevue and Tukwila. It is getting very close to home. Some have called racism America’s historical “original sin.” Where did many white people of the past get the wicked idea that their lives matter more than black lives? The question is complex but, without doubt, Darwinian theory helped to fuel our present racial fire. Comprehending the national burden of hatred is a task not only for scholars but for all Americans. So too with understanding the origins of the opportunistic criminality that has piggybacked on…
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Time to Make Fossil Fuel Industries “Pay”?

António Guterres, asbestos, carbon emissions, central planning, coal, coronavirus, COVID-19, Culture & Ethics, economic suppression, fossil fuels, fracking, global warming, globalism, natural gas, natural resources, New York Times, obesity, oil refineries, polluters, regulatory control, subsidies, United Nations
Ever since the COVID-19 crisis erupted, commentators have predicted that activists would try to hitch global warming to the ongoing fight against coronavirus — not that this required true prophetic gifts. Activists think every crisis requires the dilution of national sovereignty, increased regulations, wealth redistribution, and higher taxes — including to combat the obesity epidemic. Unsurprisingly, and right on schedule, U.N. Secretary General António Guterres contributed an op-ed in the New York Times — filled with the usual global-warming bromides — arguing that the fights against the virus and climate change should be joined into one six-point “climate positive” plan. You like economic suppression? You like heavy-handed government regulatory control? You like globalism? Then, Guterres is your man. He writes: A recovery from the coronavirus crisis must not take us just back to where we…
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Are Evangelicals “Crippling” Our Coronavirus Response?

Alabama, americans, anti-Christian bias, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chernobyl, China, churches, coronavirus, COVID-19, Darwinism, doctors, Donald Trump, Earth Day, Easter, Evangelical Christians, Evolution and Ethics, Faith & Science, Federal Government, global warming, Katherine Stewart, Medicine, New York City, New York Times, nurses, pandemic, pastors, Scientific consensus, stock boys, Thomas Huxley, truck driver, United States, Wuhan, Yan Fu
Yep, according to this New York Times op-ed by Katherine Stewart: This denial of science and critical thinking among religious ultraconservatives now haunts the American response to the coronavirus crisis. Stewart, whose disdain for evangelicals is passionate, objects particularly to the President’s invocation of Easter rather than “mid-April”: Mr. Trump’s expressed hope that the country would be “opened up and just raring to go by Easter.” He could, of course, have said, “by mid-April.” But Mr. Trump did not invoke Easter by accident, and many of his evangelical allies were pleased by his vision of “packed churches all over our country.”  “I think it would be a beautiful time,” the president said. Perhaps a Presidential wish that we will be back to business by Earth Day would have mollified Ms.…
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Fewer “Deaths of Despair” Increases U.S. Life Expectancy

addiction, addictive substances, assisted suicide, cancer, Culture & Ethics, deaths of despair, despair, fentanyl, New York Times, opioid painkillers, prosperity, suicide
Good news: U.S. life expectancy has increased. From the New York Times story: Life expectancy increased for the first time in four years in 2018, the federal government said Thursday, raising hopes that a benchmark of the nation’s health may finally be stabilizing after a rare and troubling decline that was driven by a surge in drug overdoses. Part of the reason for the improvement was a decrease in what are known as “deaths of despair”: Deaths from overdoses dropped by 4.1 percent in 2018, to 67,367 from 70,237 in 2017. The decrease was largely driven by a dip in deaths from prescription opioid painkillers, which set off the opioid epidemic in the late 1990s before heroin and, later, fentanyl moved in. Provisional data suggests those deaths continued to fall…
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