By Design, Earth Is a Planet Fit for Fire

ambient conditions, atmosphere, atmospheric pressure, civilization, combustion, Douglas Drysdale, earth, Edward McHale, fire, fire spread, fire sustainability, Fire-Maker series, gases, gravity, Intelligent Design, mankind, metabolism, metals, Mount Everest, NASA, nitrogen, oxidative metabolism, oxygen, Physics, Earth & Space, respiration, Stone Age, Technology
As we have seen so far in this series, fire was an absolutely crucial component in humanity’s rise to civilization and technology. Source
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The “Surprisingly Consistent” Answer to the Question: Are We Alone in the Universe?

a posteriori reasoning, abiogenesis, astrobiology, astronomy, biology, brain, Breakthrough Listen, carbon, consciousness, consensus, Danny C Price, Darwinism, Dyson Sphere, earth, extraterrestrial life, faith, Jeffrey Epstein, Lee Spitler, Macquarie University, Mars, materialism, neuroscience, nitrogen, Orsola De Marco, oxygen, Physics, Earth & Space, science fiction, SETI, starlight, universe
You can understand a lot about modern science if you understand SETI research. Not that SETI is all that sophisticated and certainly not because it’s been successful (it has not), but because it tells you a lot about the materialist metaphysical bias in modern science.  “The Big Question” From The Conversation: Are we alone in the Universe? The expert opinion on that, it turns out, is surprisingly consistent. “Is there other life in the Universe? I would say: probably,” Daniel Zucker, Associate Professor of astronomy at Macquarie University, tells astrophysics student and The Conversation’s editorial intern Antonio Tarquinio on today’s podcast episode. “I think that we will discover life outside of Earth in my lifetime. If not that, then in your lifetime,” says his fellow Macquarie University colleague, Professor Orsola…
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Molybdenum Is Stored in Cells by a Powered Piercing Machine

anhydride hydrolysis, armor, armor-piercing bullets, ATP, ATP-binding groove, bacteria, Biochemistry (journal), biomineralization, carbon, chemical energy, Chile, China, diet, DNA replication, Earth’s crust, Energy, energy metabolism, entropy, Evolution, genetic information, gun, human body, industry, Intelligent Design, kinetic energy, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, melting point, metal, molecular machines, molybdate, molybdenum, MoSto system, motility, nitrogen, PNAS, protein, steel, Steffen Brünle, sulfur, United States
Molybdenum comprises the second smallest percentage of mass in a normal human body, but that trace amount serves a vital function in several key enzymes. Chemical element molybdenum, affectionately called “moly” by manufacturers, is classified as a refractory metal (i.e., able to retain its shape when heated), bearing similarities to lead. It was only declared a chemical element in 1790 with the abbreviation Mo. Because of its very high melting point, it is prized in industry for its ability to toughen steel and armor. Molybdenum’s abundance in Earth’s crust is estimated at 1.2 ppm, mined mostly in China, the United States, and Chile (molybdenum.com). An Essential Element Why would soft, squishy biology need such a hard substance? The answer is that without it, life would not be possible. A 2009…
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