From Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Advice for Intelligent Design Dissidents

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, cancel culture, censorship, Culture & Ethics, dissidents, free speech, ID The Future, Intelligent Design, Live Not By Lies, Michael Egnor, neurosurgeon, Nobel Prize, Podcast, silencing tactics, Soviet Union, United States
Solzhenitsyn’s basic advice is simply not to participate with lies, and to refuse to speak what one does not believe. It’s unnervingly relevant counsel. Source
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ID by Another Name? Astronomer Says 50 Percent Chance We’re Living in Computer Simulation

base reality, Bayesian reasoning, Brian Josephson, Cambridge University, Cavendish Laboratory, Columbia University, computer simulation, David Kipping, Douglas Axe, Evolution, forecast, Intelligent Design, Jonathan McLatchie, mathematics, Michael Egnor, Nobel Prize, rain, Scientific American, Twitter, umbrella
Of course, an 80 percent chance that we live in an intelligently design world compares favorably with only a 50 percent chance. Source
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New Research Finds Molecular Machines Are Even More Amazing than Behe Realized

ATP synthase, bacterial flagellum, bucket brigade, catalysis, cryo-electron microscopy, Darwinian evolution, dimers, drive shaft, enzymes, FliD proteins, Grotthus mechanism, hook, imaging techniques, Institute of Science and Technology, Intelligent Design, Irreducible Complexity, John E. Walker, Leonid Sazanov, lipid bilayer, Michael Behe, molecular machines, Nature Communications, Nobel Prize, PNAS, Scott Minnich, Unlocking the Mystery of Life, vibrations, water molecules
With better imaging and analysis techniques, details about icons of design are coming into clearer focus. The icons are looking better than ever. Source
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Say Happy Birthday to Charles Darwin

American Humanist Association, apostles, Austria, birthday gift, Brazil, Charles Darwin, Darwin Day, David Gelernter, Debating Darwin's Doubt, digital download, Evolution, Facebook, Foresight (book), Intelligent Design, Israel, Italy, Marcos Eberlin, Nobel Prize, scholars, scientists, South America, Yale University
Today, February 12, is Charles Darwin’s birthday. For the past two decades, secularists and atheists have celebrated “Darwin Day” almost like a religious holiday. Tonight, for example, the American Humanist Association will hold an event where they promise you can “Discover how Darwin’s apostles… launched a campaign for truth.” I’m not kidding — they really do refer to “Darwin’s apostles”! Meanwhile, the official Facebook page for Darwin Day posts statements like this: “Using scientific logic, we can be as sure of God’s nonexistence as we are of the nonexistence of the aether, phlogiston or werewolves!” The Cult of Darwin While some continue to worship in the cult of Darwin, here is some good news in time for Darwin’s birthday: The number of prominent scientists around the world who are leaving Darwin behind…
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New Atheism: A Shipwreck of Fools

aquinas, Arc Digital, Asherah poles, Atheism, autopsy, bacteria, book deals, child sacrifice, Christopher Hitchens, computer program, creation myth, Edward Feser, evolutionary theory, Faith & Science, First Amendment, Five Ways, Gaia, genetic information, John Haldane, Lawrence Krauss, Ludwig Wittgenstein, meat machines, New Atheists, Nobel Prize, paganism, plagiarism, religion, Richard Dawkins, Valley of Hinnom
New Atheism is dead. It was conceptually dead from birth, but now it’s stopped twitching. Ben Sixsmith at Arc Digital has a good article with a lot of insight into its demise. From  “New Atheism: An Autopsy”: To be sure, New Atheists could be very, very bad at arguing that God does not exist. There was, for example, Lawrence Krauss writing a book about how something can come from nothing while attributing material qualities to the latter. There was Richard Dawkins trying to refute the famous “Five Ways” of Aquinas without even attempting to understand their terms. (“Whereof one cannot speak,” groaned Wittgenstein, “Thereof one must remain silent.”) There was Christopher Hitchens striding into philosophy like an elephant onto an ice skating rink and saying: “…the postulate of a designer…
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Are the Laws of the Universe “Inevitable”?

Adam Falkowski, Albert Einstein, beauty of nature, Big Bang, black holes, CEA Saclay, Daniel Baumann, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Laurentiu Rodina, laws of the universe, mathematics, metric tensor, Natalie Wolchover, Nobel Prize, Paul Dirac, physics, Physics, Earth & Space, Quanta Magazine, quantum mechanics, Shakespearean sonnet, Sistine Chapel, Steven Weinberg, theory of gravity, University of Amsterdam
Natalie Wolchover at Quanta Magazine has a thoughtful but misguided essay on the “inevitability” of the laws of nature. She writes: Compared to the unsolved mysteries of the universe, far less gets said about one of the most profound facts to have crystallized in physics over the past half-century: To an astonishing degree, nature is the way it is because it couldn’t be any different. “There’s just no freedom in the laws of physics that we have,” said Daniel Baumann, a theoretical physicist at the University of Amsterdam. She cites Baumann to describe the incredible interlocked intricacy of physical laws: [L]aws essentially dictate one another through their mutual consistency — that nature “pulls itself up by its own bootstraps.” The idea turns out to explain a huge amount about the universe.…
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