Can Natural Reward Theory Save Natural Selection?

alleles, animals, Burgess Shale, Cambrian Explosion, cotton, Darwinian theory, ecosystems, Evolution, foresight, fossil record, John Rust, Macroevolution, materialism, molecular machines, Monopoly, natural selection, Owen M. Gilbert, oxygen, pseudoscience, Rethinking Ecology, selection pressure, teleology, The Origin of Species, Thomas Malthus, University of Texas
An evolutionist dismantles natural selection, then tries to rescue it with his own theory. It won’t work. Source
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#5 Story of 2020: Coronavirus, Intelligent Design, and Evolution

2019-nCoV, body plans, Charles Darwin, coronavirus, COVID-19, Darwinian evolution, Design Inference, disease, DNA, Edward Jenner, epidemic, Evolution, evolutionary biologists, genetic engineers, Ignác Semmelweis, Intelligent Design, International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, living cell, Macroevolution, Medicine, MERS-CoV, Michael Dini, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, molecular biology, mutation, natural selection, Nature Medicine, New York Post, organs, oxygen, pandemic, quarantine, RNA, SARS-CoV-2, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, smallpox, species, The Origin of Species, Theodosius Dobzhansky, virus, World Health Organization, Wuhan
The measures being taken against the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic owe nothing to evolutionary theory. Source
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Doctor’s Diary: Evolution in the Country of the Blind

anatomy, animals, apes, atheists, babies, birth canal, Brazilian Academy of Sciences, childbirth, chromosomes, Creativity, DNA, ductus arteriosus, earthquake, Ecuador, foresight, H.G. Wells, heteropalindromes, human evolution, human exceptionalism, Human Origins, humans, Intelligent Design, invention, Marcos Eberlin, Minnesota, orphan genes, oxygen, P.Z. Myers, parable, Periodic Table, phenotypes, Richard Dawkins, The Country of the Blind, Tree of Life
Fans of H. G. Wells are probably familiar with his 1904 short story, “The Country of the Blind.” Source
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What if Our Muscles Were Less Powerful?

ATP, blood, charcoal, circulatory system, Energy, Fire-Maker series, heart, human body, Intelligent Design, kilns, medical school, metabolic energy, metallurgy, miniature human, molecular motor, muscle tissues, muscles, myosin, oxygen, respiration, respiratory system, strength, twigs, wood
As every medical student comes to learn when first dissecting the human body at medical school, our limbs are almost entirely composed of muscles. Source
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The Role of Lignin for Fire, Explained

Carboniferous Period, charcoal, conduction, convection, evaporative cooling, fire, Fire-Maker series, fire-making, fitness, Goldilocks, humus, industrial age, Intelligent Design, iron, Life Sciences, lignin, metallurgy, metals, nature, organic compounds, oxygen, photosynthesis, physiology, plant cells, pottery, radiation, steam engine, trees, wood, woody plants
Without lignin, there would be no woody plants, no wood, no coal, no charcoal, no fire, no pottery, and certainly no iron or metallurgy. Source
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By Design, Earth Is a Planet Fit for Fire

ambient conditions, atmosphere, atmospheric pressure, civilization, combustion, Douglas Drysdale, earth, Edward McHale, fire, fire spread, fire sustainability, Fire-Maker series, gases, gravity, Intelligent Design, mankind, metabolism, metals, Mount Everest, NASA, nitrogen, oxidative metabolism, oxygen, Physics, Earth & Space, respiration, Stone Age, Technology
As we have seen so far in this series, fire was an absolutely crucial component in humanity’s rise to civilization and technology. Source
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In Carbon Isotope Excursions, Darwinists Lose Another Excuse for the Cambrian Explosion

animals, arthropods, biology, bioRxiv, body plans, Cambrian Explosion, Cambrian fossils, Cambrian News, Cambrian phyla, Canada, carbon, carbon isotope excursions, Darwin's Doubt, Darwinian tree, Ediacaran explosion, Ediacaran fossils, Evolution, fossil record, Gaskiers deglaciation, geochemistry, Newfoundland, Oman, oxygen, PNAS, Proterozoic Eon, Stephen Meyer, Uncategorized
The claim that a spike in carbon isotope concentrations led to the explosion of biological diversity in the Cambrian doesn’t hold up, as if it would have helped, anyway. Source
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Listen: Michael Behe on a Citrate Death Spiral

bacteria, citrate, Darwin Devolves, death rates, E. coli, Evolution, evolutionary theory, genes, genetic information, Long Term Evolution Experiment, Michael Behe, Michigan State University, mutations, novel forms, oxygen
On a new episode of ID the Future, biochemist Michael Behe reviews the Long Term Evolution Experiment (LTEE) at Michigan State, where Richard Lenki’s team was initially excited to see what they thought was a new species forming in their flasks of E. coli. Download the podcast or listen to it here. As Behe has written at Evolution News, one flask of E. coli in Lenski’s experiment evolved the... Source
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Behe Vindicated Again: Sherpas Climb Everest Easier, Because Darwin Devolves

altitude, brown bears, climbing, Daisheng Song, Darwin Devolves, Darwinism, Evolution, genes, genetic information, genome, Han Chinese, hemoglobin, Himalayas, Intelligent Design, interfertility, loss of function, lowlanders, Michael Behe, Mount Everest, mount improbable, natural selection, Nepalese, oxygen, Phd2, PNAS, polar bears, positive selection, seal meat, Sherpa, super-athletes, Tibetans, Wikipedia
How can Tibetans survive high altitudes that leave lowlanders gasping? The answer is found in broken genes. A new paper on the Tibetan genome vindicates what Michael Behe said in Darwin Devolves: evolution breaks things, but sometimes, like in the case of polar bears, the result can allow organisms to thrive in specific environments. Yes, this follows on the heels of last week’s Behe vindication; see here. A team of 16 scientists, writing in PNAS, sought to understand the genetic basis for Tibetan high-altitude adaptation in more detail. Tibetans and Nepalese, many of whom serve as guides for lowlanders wanting to conquer Mount Everest, routinely carry heavy burdens at altitudes above 14,000 feet, the average elevation on the Tibetan plateau. In its entry on Sherpa people, Wikipedia notes, Many Sherpa…
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