How to Destroy Love with Darwinism

Alice in Wonderland, alleles, altruism, antelopes, ants, behavior, behaviorism, biology, bioRxiv, bonobos, cooperation, Darwinian theory, Evolution, game theory, genetic determinism, Green Beard hypothesis, Kaleda K. Denton, kin selection, Lausanne University, leaping, lions, Love, pandemic, Red Queen hypothesis, slime molds, watchman crow
When Darwin proposed a new view of biology based on chance, he cheapened everything, including our most precious human values. Source
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#5 Story of 2020: Coronavirus, Intelligent Design, and Evolution

2019-nCoV, body plans, Charles Darwin, coronavirus, COVID-19, Darwinian evolution, Design Inference, disease, DNA, Edward Jenner, epidemic, Evolution, evolutionary biologists, genetic engineers, Ignác Semmelweis, Intelligent Design, International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, living cell, Macroevolution, Medicine, MERS-CoV, Michael Dini, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, molecular biology, mutation, natural selection, Nature Medicine, New York Post, organs, oxygen, pandemic, quarantine, RNA, SARS-CoV-2, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, smallpox, species, The Origin of Species, Theodosius Dobzhansky, virus, World Health Organization, Wuhan
The measures being taken against the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic owe nothing to evolutionary theory. Source
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#6 Story of 2020: Amid a Pandemic, Wisdom from C. S. Lewis

Adolf Hitler, Anglo-Irish writers, Anxiety, Belfast, bleach, Boxen, C.S. Lewis, Castlereagh Hills, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cherry blossoms, churches, coronavirus, Europe, Faith & Science, fear, grocery stores, gyms, hand sanitizer, isolation, Letters of C.S. Lewis, Marion Wade Center, movie theaters, Nazis, Northern Ireland, pandemic, restaurants, rubbing alcohol, Seattle, The Weight of Glory, toilet paper, tuberculosis, University of Washington, W.H. Lewis, war, Wheaton College, World War I, World War II, worry, “Learning in War-Time”
Lewis's advice seems eerily applicable to our own situation, just substitute “pandemic” for “war.” Source
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Here’s How We Get Around the Wikipedia Roadblock

censorship, Center for Science & Culture, chaos, COVID-19, Creativity, destruction, editors, Evolution News, Facebook, free speech, freedom, Google, Günter Bechly, Human Zoos, Internet, Larry Sanger, lies, Long Story Short, pandemic, protest, Science Uprising, Seattle, Social media, thought police, truth, Twitter, Walter Bradley, Wikipedia, YouTube videos
Something has gone seriously wrong in our culture. Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, strict, arbitrary, and undemocratic dictates for the law-abiding, and a free-for-all for those who sow chaos disguised as “protest,” you have to wonder what will come next. In these mad times, Discovery Institute’s mission — to advance creativity over destruction — has never seemed more urgent. I want to suggest a way that you can join us in that. However, there’s a time limit: to help, you need to act by the end of Tuesday, June 30. Many Americans are isolated from others. At the same time, the King’s Highway of news, information, and inspiration — social media and other online sources — is increasingly blocked. Facebook, Google, and Twitter no longer hide their bias and censorship.  Newcomers…
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Suicide by Zoom — Technology and Dehumanization

abortion, assisted suicide, California, coronavirus, Culture & Ethics, dehumanization, Humanize, Medicine, Meera Shah, New York State, oncologists, Oregon, oxymoron, pandemic, patients, Philadelphia Inquirer, Planned Parenthood, silver lining, suicide, Technology, telehealth, telemedicine, Wesley Smith, Zoom
Some have seen a silver lining in the pandemic and welcomed its encouragement of medicine practiced online, potentially freeing doctors to work across state borders, and widening access to care (or virtual care) generally. I’m not sure that’s to be celebrated in its entirety. The trend toward “telehealth” undercuts the crucial personal relationship between doctor and patient, which had already been in retreat before the virus came along. There are other downsides, too, including lethal ones. As the Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “The pandemic is helping U.S. abortion-rights advocates achieve a long-standing goal: Make it easier for women to use pills to end pregnancies up to 10 weeks.” Get your abortion pills online — what could be more convenient? NPR approves, quoting New York physician Meera Shah with Planned Parenthood: “I…
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Human Zoos — How “Science” Fueled the Racial Fire

African-American, Africans, alt-right, Bellevue, Black Lives Matter, Bronx Zoo, Caucasian, Charles Darwin, clergy, Culture & Ethics, Discovery Institute, Evolution, George Floyd, Human Zoos, John West, lockdown, looting, Minneapolis, New York City, New York Times, original sin, Ota Benga, pandemic, police brutality, protests, pygmies, Racism, scientific racism, Seattle, South Bronx, St. Louis, textbooks, The Descent of Man, The Hub, Tukwila, United States, Wesley Smith
Scorching images from across the country fill our screens, a reminder that the racial past remains an unhealed burn in America’s present. The mood in our own area is shocked and anxious, as we watched violence and looting spread from Seattle to outlying cities like Bellevue and Tukwila. It is getting very close to home. Some have called racism America’s historical “original sin.” Where did many white people of the past get the wicked idea that their lives matter more than black lives? The question is complex but, without doubt, Darwinian theory helped to fuel our present racial fire. Comprehending the national burden of hatred is a task not only for scholars but for all Americans. So too with understanding the origins of the opportunistic criminality that has piggybacked on…
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Doctor’s Diary: Fear Is a Gift from Our Designer

compassion, coronavirus, courage, emotions, fear, Gavin de Becker, Intelligent Design, joy, Love, murder hornets, pain, pandemic, parking structure, patients, physicians, sweat, The Gift of Fear, yellow jackets
Editor’s note: Dr. Simmons is the author most recently of Are We Here to Re-Create Ourselves? He is a Fellow with Discovery Institute’s Center for Science & Culture. As a physician, I have cared for many patients who were fearful. Often with good reason, but not always. Might fear actually be a purposeful design? Might it be present to protect a person? One might liken fear to pain, which is a similar gift. How would we have survived as a species if running bare-footed across sharp rocks or being stung by an irritated hive of yellow jackets (or murder hornets!) didn’t hurt? Without pain how would a child learn not to touch a hot stove? Or, pull away immediately to lessen the damage? In 1997, Gavin de Becker authored The Gift of…
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The COVID Crisis and Our Healthcare System

borders, boroughs of New York, China, COVID-19, elderly people, Europe, experts, government planners, healthcare, Iran, Italy, Manhattan, mass transit, Medicine, mortality, New York City, nursing homes, officials, pandemic, patients, prisons, Queens, socialism, Staten Island, statism, United States, Venezuela, Wuhan, xenophobia
An essay by a pair of economists in Foreign Policy magazine pins the blame for our pandemic crisis on deficiencies in our health care system. It recommends a variety of interventions, each of which (predictably) entails more government control of health care by experts like… the authors of the essay. To see the COVID response as signifying a failure of the healthcare system is an insult to the brave and skilled people who responded so effectively to this virus, including colleagues at my own hospital on New York’s corona frontline. The authors, and others who think similarly, misunderstand the roots of the crisis and misunderstand the role the health care system has played. More importantly, they misunderstand the role of statism in generating this pandemic.  Retooled Overnight Given the unexpected…
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Thomas Aquinas Weighs in on the Coronavirus and Public Policy

Andrew McDiarmid, China, coronavirus, COVID-19, double effect, Evolution News, health, ID The Future, Medicine, neurosurgeon, pandemic, Podcast, policymakers, political calculations, public policy, science, Thomas Aquinas, transparency, WHO
On a new episode of ID the Future, host Andrew McDiarmid speaks with pediatric neurosurgeon and professor Michael Egnor about public policy decisions regarding the coronavirus. Download the podcast or listen to it here. In a conversation based on a recent article for Evolution News, Egnor says scientists should have “stayed in their lane,” giving policymakers the information that science can provide about a potential pandemic, and left the political calculations alone. He argues that WHO failed in one of its primary jobs, which is providing timely information and recommendations for preventing and slowing the spread of pandemics. They sat on information about COVID-19 for weeks, long after they knew there was a serious problem in China. Egnor also urges policymakers to apply science along with other expert information in a…
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From Pfizer, Scientism and Self-Congratulation

art, authority, Brian Miller, C.S. Lewis, China, coronavirus, COVID-19, Creativity, Discovery Institute, Douglas Axe, economic collapse, entertainment, history, mask, medical science, Medicine, Michael Egnor, music, pandemic, Pfizer Inc., philosophy, Politics, religion, Rich Lowry, Robert J. Marks, scientism, social distancing, totem, Wesley Smith, worship, Wuhan
In the race to defeat the coronavirus, good fortune to Pfizer Inc., among others. The drug giant said last week “it will begin testing of its experimental vaccine in the U.S. as early as next week.” But this new ad from Pfizer goes over the top in its self-congratulation: They say: At a time when things are most uncertain, we turn to the most certain thing there is: Science. Science can overcome diseases, create cures, and yes, beat pandemics. Because when it’s faced with a new opponent, it doesn’t back down. It revs up, asking questions till it finds what it’s looking for. That’s the power of science. Well actually, that’s the power of creative ingenuity in general, a capacity unique to human beings, that is put to use in…
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