Is Evolution’s “Third Way” Natural? (And Are We Allowed to Reference It?) 

Andreas Wagner, Carl Hemple, creationism, Denis Noble, equivocation, Evolution, evolutionary biologists, Hemple’s Dilemma, Intelligent Design, James Shapiro, natural, naturalism, neo-Darwinian synthesis, philosophers, Plato, Platonic forms, Raju Pookottil, reality, supernatural, The Arrival of the Fittest, The Third Way, University of Zurich
As the body of evidence against the Darwinian model has grown ever larger, many scientists have started peeling off to look for other options. Source
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Understanding Design Arguments: An Introduction for Catholics

Aristotle, atomists, Benjamin Wiker, biology, Church Fathers, Democritus, Douglas Axe, Epicurus, Evolution, Faith & Science, God's Grandeur, Gregory of Nazianzen, Intelligent Design, James Sinclair, Jonathan Witt, Leucippus, Michael Behe, Michael Denton, New Atheists, philosophy, physics, Plato, Robin Collins, Roman Catholics, Scopes Monkey Trial, scripture, Socrates, Stephen Meyer, stereotypes, Vatican I, william lane craig, Xenophon, zero-sum game
What ID denies is that every feature of nature is the product of natural forces all the way down. This commitment is necessarily shared by Catholics. Source
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Engineering Principles Explain Biological Systems Better than Evolutionary Theory

antiquity, Apostle Paul, Aristotle, atomism, biology, Charles Darwin, Copernican Revolution, Engineering, Evolution, Francisco Ayala, genetics, Hippocrates, Intelligent Design, Lucretius, materialism, Modern Synthesis, natural processes, Neo-Darwinism, philosophy, Plato, population genetics, Romans, Science and Faith in Dialogue, teleology
Hippocrates proposed in the late 5th or early 4th century BC a model for heredity and adaptation that Charles Darwin described as nearly identical to his own. Source
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Old Wine in New Bottles: How Darwin Recruited Malthus to Fortify a Failed Idea from Antiquity

abiogenesis, Alphonse de Candolle, Aristotle, atheists, atomism, Charles Bradlaugh, Charles Darwin, Charles Lyell, Christianity, complexification, David Hume, Edward Aveling, Epicurus, Erasmus Darwin, Evolution, Friedrich Engels, Georges Cuvier, Gertrude Himmelfarb, Greece, Homo sapiens, Intelligent Design, Karl Marx, Law of Correlation, Lucretius, Matthew Arnold, Middle Ages, natural selection, Origin of Species, Patrick Matthew, Plato, Poor Law, Rome, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas Malthus, transhumanism, Unmoved Mover, Victorian England, William Paley
It was undoubtedly a tremendous philosophical coup for Darwin whose knowledge of formal philosophy was limited. Source
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In His New Book, Denton Shows How Science Leads the Charge to Theism

astrophysicists, Atheism, bioengineering, biology, brain, Charles Darwin, Copernican Revolution, cosmology, cytology, demiurge, Democritus, Denis Diderot, earth, Erasmus Darwin, Faith & Science, fine-tuning, human eye, humankind, Judeo-Christian tradition, life, natural selection, nature, Paul Davies, philosophes, Physics, Earth & Space, physiology, Plato, purpose, teleology, The Miracle of Man, theism, William Paley
In his new book, Michael Denton is particularly strong on what he terms “the post-Copernican delusion of mankind’s cosmic irrelevance.” Source
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Nothing New Under the Sun

Anthony Flew, Argument from Complexity, Aristotle, Atheism, British Rationalist Association, Cicero, Cristian Bandea, DNA, electron microscope, Epicurus, Eric Metaxas, Faith & Science, First Cause, Galen, God of the Details, intellectual history, Intelligent Design, Irreducible Complexity, Is Atheism Dead?, Lucretius, Methodist revival, Paul Davies, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Plato, Return of the God Hypothesis, Stephen Meyer, The Mind of God, The Necessity of Atheism, The Return to the God Paradigm, Welsh revival
The inference to a First Cause has begun to percolate down to people who hold no prior allegiance to any of the world’s accredited religions. Source
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Sunday with the Devil’s Acolyte — Thomas Henry Huxley

A Journal of the Plague Year, Charles F. Mullett, common descent, Copernican principle, Daniel Defoe, Evolution, Faith & Science, fleas, Human Zoos, Jacques Barzun, John West, London, Natural Law and the Structure of Matter, pandemic, plague, Plato, Racism, rats, Ruth Barton, scientism, St. Martin's Hall, Stephen Porter, The X Men, Thomas Henry Huxley, Werner Heisenberg, X Club, Yersinia pestis
Although the designation of Huxley as Darwin’s “bulldog” is well known, acolyte is a more appropriate term and here’s why. Source
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The Main Argument of The Abolition of Man

Alec King, Aristotle, British schools, C.S. Lewis, Christianity, Culture & Ethics, debunking, England, English, Friedrich Nietzsche, Gaius, Hinduism, literature, Martin Ketley, Men without Chests, pedagogy, philosophy, Plato, propaganda, Saint Augustine, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, sublime, Tao, That Hideous Strength, The Abolition of Man, The Conditioners, The Control of Language, The Green Book, Thomas Traherne, thumos, Titius, upper forms, values, Wheaton College
Lewis foresees a class of men called “the Conditioners.” The Conditioners have “seen through” all attempts to ground behaviour in any ultimate truth. Source
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