Old Wine in New Bottles: How Darwin Recruited Malthus to Fortify a Failed Idea from Antiquity

abiogenesis, Alphonse de Candolle, Aristotle, atheists, atomism, Charles Bradlaugh, Charles Darwin, Charles Lyell, Christianity, complexification, David Hume, Edward Aveling, Epicurus, Erasmus Darwin, Evolution, Friedrich Engels, Georges Cuvier, Gertrude Himmelfarb, Greece, Homo sapiens, Intelligent Design, Karl Marx, Law of Correlation, Lucretius, Matthew Arnold, Middle Ages, natural selection, Origin of Species, Patrick Matthew, Plato, Poor Law, Rome, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas Malthus, transhumanism, Unmoved Mover, Victorian England, William Paley
It was undoubtedly a tremendous philosophical coup for Darwin whose knowledge of formal philosophy was limited. Source
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In His New Book, Denton Shows How Science Leads the Charge to Theism

astrophysicists, Atheism, bioengineering, biology, brain, Charles Darwin, Copernican Revolution, cosmology, cytology, demiurge, Democritus, Denis Diderot, earth, Erasmus Darwin, Faith & Science, fine-tuning, human eye, humankind, Judeo-Christian tradition, life, natural selection, nature, Paul Davies, philosophes, Physics, Earth & Space, physiology, Plato, purpose, teleology, The Miracle of Man, theism, William Paley
In his new book, Michael Denton is particularly strong on what he terms “the post-Copernican delusion of mankind’s cosmic irrelevance.” Source
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Nothing New Under the Sun

Anthony Flew, Argument from Complexity, Aristotle, Atheism, British Rationalist Association, Cicero, Cristian Bandea, DNA, electron microscope, Epicurus, Eric Metaxas, Faith & Science, First Cause, Galen, God of the Details, intellectual history, Intelligent Design, Irreducible Complexity, Is Atheism Dead?, Lucretius, Methodist revival, Paul Davies, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Plato, Return of the God Hypothesis, Stephen Meyer, The Mind of God, The Necessity of Atheism, The Return to the God Paradigm, Welsh revival
The inference to a First Cause has begun to percolate down to people who hold no prior allegiance to any of the world’s accredited religions. Source
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Sunday with the Devil’s Acolyte — Thomas Henry Huxley

A Journal of the Plague Year, Charles F. Mullett, common descent, Copernican principle, Daniel Defoe, Evolution, Faith & Science, fleas, Human Zoos, Jacques Barzun, John West, London, Natural Law and the Structure of Matter, pandemic, plague, Plato, Racism, rats, Ruth Barton, scientism, St. Martin's Hall, Stephen Porter, The X Men, Thomas Henry Huxley, Werner Heisenberg, X Club, Yersinia pestis
Although the designation of Huxley as Darwin’s “bulldog” is well known, acolyte is a more appropriate term and here’s why. Source
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The Main Argument of The Abolition of Man

Alec King, Aristotle, British schools, C.S. Lewis, Christianity, Culture & Ethics, debunking, England, English, Friedrich Nietzsche, Gaius, Hinduism, literature, Martin Ketley, Men without Chests, pedagogy, philosophy, Plato, propaganda, Saint Augustine, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, sublime, Tao, That Hideous Strength, The Abolition of Man, The Conditioners, The Control of Language, The Green Book, Thomas Traherne, thumos, Titius, upper forms, values, Wheaton College
Lewis foresees a class of men called “the Conditioners.” The Conditioners have “seen through” all attempts to ground behaviour in any ultimate truth. Source
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Darwinism Paved the Way to Our Perilous Cultural Moment

Adolf Hitler, atomization, Chicago, civilization, Cliff Mass, Communism, Darwinian evolution, Dawinism, democracy, Edward Feser, Evolution, freedom, Friedrich Engels, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Germany, Hannah Arendt, Karl Marx, Kristallnacht, lockdown, Ludwig Feuerbach, Michael Egnor, Mind Matters, Nazism, npr, paralysis, Plato, Portland, terror, tyranny
The year so far has delivered a stunning lesson in the fragility of freedom and of civilization. Source
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The Biggest Myth So Far in Cosmos 3.0 — Baruch Spinoza as Science Hero

Albert Einstein, aliens, ancient Greeks, Aristotle, Baruch Spinoza, Bible, Christiaan Huygens, Christianity, Cosmos 3.0, Evolution News, extraterrestrial life, Faith & Science, Galileo Galilei, geometry, Giordano Bruno, harmonic law, Herwart von Hohenburg, historical errors, Johannes Kepler, Judaism, Michael J. Crowe, Michael Maestlin, National Geographic Channel, nature, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Physics, Earth & Space, planetary motion, Plato, René Descartes, Saint Augustine, The Assayer, Two Books, Unbelievable?
The third season of Cosmos has released four episodes so far, with more to come this Monday, on Fox and the National Geographic channel. Evolution News has commented already, here, here, here, and here. After watching these episodes, I have concluded that the most consequential historical error to correct as yet concerns the treatment of Spinoza in episode one. The series designates Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677) as the next greatest persecuted hero of science after Giordano Bruno (as depicted in Cosmos 2.0; see my video discussion, “Unbelievable Mythbusting: Giordano Bruno Was a Martyr, Yes, but Not for Science”). Although Bruno was burned to death in 1600 for his religious (not scientific) views, the attempted murder of Spinoza, if it occurred, was likely due to a disputed business transaction (not science or…
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Mystery of Life’s Origin — Intelligent Design’s Original Edition, Greatly Expanded, on Sale Now!

abiogenesis, Alfred Russel Wallace, Allan Bloom, Anaxagoras, Brian Miller, Charles Darwin, Charles Lyell, Charles Thaxton, chemical evolution, Claude Shannon, Dean Kenyon, DNA, Erasmus Darwin, Frankenstein, galvanism, Guillermo Gonzalez, Harvard University, Hubert Yockey, Intelligent Design, James Tour, Jonathan Wells, Joseph Hooker, Leslie Orgel, Lord Byron, Louis Pasteur, Luigi Galvani, Mary Shelley, Michael Polanyi, Miller-Urey experiment, origin of life, Percy Shelley, Plato, Reijer Hooykaas, RNA, Roger L. Olsen, San Francisco State University, Shannon information, Signature in the Cell, Socrates, spaghetti, specified complexity, Stephen Meyer, The Mystery of Life’s Origin, The Return of the God Hypothesis, uniformitarianism, Walter Bradley, William Dembski
Editor’s note: We are delighted today to offer a new book from Discovery Institute Press, The Mystery of Life’s Origin: The Continuing Controversy, a greatly expanded and updated version of the book that, in 1984, launched the intelligent design movement. The following is excerpted from Discovery Institute Senior Fellow David Klinghoffer’s historical introduction to the work. Other brand new chapters on the “continuing controversy” about the origin of life are by chemist James Tour, physicist Brian Miller, astronomer Guillermo Gonzalez, biologist Jonathan Wells, and philosopher of science Stephen C. Meyer. How does life emerge from that which is not alive? This mystery exercises a peculiar fascination, with the power to elicit remarkable feats of imagination. As the novelist Mary Shelley recalled, her invention of the story of Frankenstein traced back…
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