Can Natural Reward Theory Save Natural Selection?

alleles, animals, Burgess Shale, Cambrian Explosion, cotton, Darwinian theory, ecosystems, Evolution, foresight, fossil record, John Rust, Macroevolution, materialism, molecular machines, Monopoly, natural selection, Owen M. Gilbert, oxygen, pseudoscience, Rethinking Ecology, selection pressure, teleology, The Origin of Species, Thomas Malthus, University of Texas
An evolutionist dismantles natural selection, then tries to rescue it with his own theory. It won’t work. Source
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#5 Story of 2020: Coronavirus, Intelligent Design, and Evolution

2019-nCoV, body plans, Charles Darwin, coronavirus, COVID-19, Darwinian evolution, Design Inference, disease, DNA, Edward Jenner, epidemic, Evolution, evolutionary biologists, genetic engineers, Ignác Semmelweis, Intelligent Design, International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, living cell, Macroevolution, Medicine, MERS-CoV, Michael Dini, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, molecular biology, mutation, natural selection, Nature Medicine, New York Post, organs, oxygen, pandemic, quarantine, RNA, SARS-CoV-2, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, smallpox, species, The Origin of Species, Theodosius Dobzhansky, virus, World Health Organization, Wuhan
The measures being taken against the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic owe nothing to evolutionary theory. Source
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Ignoring the Obvious: Convergent Evolution in Strickberger’s Evolution

adaptive challenges, Benedikt Hallgrimsson, biology, Brian K. Hall, convergence, convergent evolution, Darwinism, engineer, Ernst Mayr, Evolution, flowering plants, Francois Jacob, George Ledyard Stebbins, natural selection, neo-Darwinian theory, parallelism, plant evolution, Simon Conway Morris, St. George Jackson Mivart, Strickberger’s Evolution, textbooks, The Origin of Species, tinkerer, What Evolution Is
Remarkably, even Ernst Mayr was forced to tacitly acknowledge the challenge to Darwinism posed by convergence. Source
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To Avoid Debate, Darwinists at the AAAS Would Even Censor…Darwin

Adam Sedgwick, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Biological Sciences section, business meeting, Cambridge University, Charles Darwin, David Burgess, Evolution, free speech, Harvard University, Herman Bouma, Karl Nageli, Louis Agassiz, National Science Teaching Association, natural selection, neo-Darwinian evolution, pedagogy, professors, students, teachers, The Origin of Species, Vicki Chandler
A modest proposal to teach evolution the way Darwin treated his own theory has “no support” from one of the world’s most powerful scientific organizations. Source
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Does The Cambrian Explosion Disprove Darwinism?

2. Does God Exist?, Apologetics, Christianity, Darwin, Evidence, Evolution, God, JesusIsNotAFakeNews, naturalism, Origin, Philosophy of Science, Ryan Leasure, The Cambrian Explosion, The Origin of Species
By Ryan Leasure In The Origin of Species, Charles Darwin argued that “all the organic beings which have ever lived on this earth have descended from some one primordial form.”1 Darwin suggested that this primordial life form gradually developed into new life forms, which subsequently developed more life forms, eventually producing all the complex life forms we see today. In short, Darwin asserted that all life descended from a common ancestor. And starting from that original ancestor, he believed nature selected the fittest species which would survive, reproduce, and last for generations. At the same time, nature would sift out the weaker species. Darwin famously pictured the history of life as a tree. The first life form was the trunk, and all subsequent life forms are the branches. He was certain that the…
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Book Excerpt: A Factory That Builds Factories That Build Factories That…

abiogenesis, bacteria, Charles Darwin, Darwinian evolution, early Earth, factories, Gerald F. Joyce, Harvard University, Holy Grail, Intelligent Design, Jack Szostak, Joseph Hooker, Max Schultze, metabolic pathways, molecules, National Public Radio, natural selection, origin of life, Oxford University, protoplasm, random mutations, Richard Dawkins, self-replication, The Origin of Species, The Selfish Gene
Editor’s note: The following is an excerpt from the the new book from Discovery Institute Press, Evolution & Intelligent Design in a Nutshell. Eric H. Anderson is a lawyer, software engineering executive, and writer on intelligent design. Nobel Prize recipient and Harvard origin-of-life researcher Jack Szostak once remarked, “In my lab, we’re interested in the transition from chemistry to early biology on the early earth…. You want something that can grow and divide and, most importantly, exhibit Darwinian evolution.”1 Another noted origin-of-life researcher, Gerald F. Joyce, says much the same thing. When asked about the idea that chemicals might have come together on the early Earth to form something that could copy itself, Joyce responded, “That’s what we and others are interested in because that’s sort of, you know, the…
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Zoom Webinar with Wells, Sternberg on Whale Evolution; Join Us on April 23!

bears, Binghamton University, biologists, Center for Science & Culture, Charles Darwin, Darwinism, Discovery Institute, Evolution, Florida International University, Intelligent Design, Is Homology Evidence for Evolution?, Jonathan Wells, Richard Sternberg, scientists, The Origin of Species, U.C. Berkeley, webinar, Whale of an Evolution Tale, whales, Yale University, Zoom
Darwinists often point to the whale fossil record as one of the best examples of an evolutionary transition. But is it? Charles Darwin wrote in The Origin of Species: “I can see no difficulty in a race of bears being rendered, by natural selection, more and more aquatic in their structure and habits, with larger and larger mouths, till a creature was produced as monstrous as a whale.” Bears turning into whales? Scientists today disagree, instead claiming that other land animals were the real precursors to today’s whales. “Just think of all the parameters that would have to be modified,” says biologist and Center for Science & Culture Senior Fellow Richard Sternberg, “and then multiply that by, I don’t know — a thousandfold, or more than that. That’s the scale of…
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