Something Is Missing from Bronx Zoo’s Apology

African-American history, Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, American Eugenics Society, Black Lives Matter, Bronx Zoo, Civic Biology, Cristián Samper, Culture & Ethics, Darwinian evolution, Discovery Institute, eugenics, Evolution, evolutionary science, Fox News, George Floyd, Henry Fairfield Osborn, Human Zoos, Igorot, John West, Madison Grant, Monkey Zoo, multiplication table, New York Times, Ota Benga, Philippines, pseudoscientific racism, pygmy, Robin DiAngelo, Seattle, The Passing of the Great Race, University of Washington, White Fragility, Wildlife Conservation Society
The truth is that placing a man in the Monkey House was intended as an education for the public in Darwinian evolution. Source
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White Fragility — A Free Pass for Scientists?

Africans, Alexander H. Stephens, blacks, Carl Bergstrom, Caucasians, Christopher Rufo, city employees, Civic Biology, Confederacy, Cornerstone Speech, Culture & Ethics, Darwinists, Ethiopian, eugenics, Europe, Evolution, genocide, human evolution, Human Zoos, John West, North American, Origin of Species, racial injustice, Robin DiAngelo, scientific racism, Scopes Monkey Trial, Seattle, Second Reich, self-talk, The Biology of the Second Reich, The Descent of Man, thought-policing, United States, University of Washington, White Fragility, whites
“White Fragility” is the phrase of the moment. It refers to an unwillingness on the part of white people to admit “complicity” with racism. Source
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Rare Earth at Twenty — And My Connection

American Scientist, astrobiology, astronomy, Charles Lineweaver, Christopher McKay, Discovery Institute, earth, extraterrestrial intelligence, extraterrestrial life, galactic habitable zone, Geoff Marcy, Hugh Ross, Icarus, Intelligent Design, interplanetary dust particles, James Kasting, Jay Richards, meteorites, Milky Way, Peter D. Ward, Physics Today, Physics, Earth & Space, Rare Earth, Science (journal), SETI, solar system, Steven J. Dick, The Privileged Planet, University of Washington, Woodruff Sullivan
This past January marked the 20th anniversary of the publication of the best-selling and influential book Rare Earth: Why Complex Life Is Uncommon in the Universe, by Peter D. Ward and Donald E. Brownlee. As the subtitle suggests, the authors argue that planets like Earth that have complex life are rare, while simple life may be common. Some Background Brownlee and Ward were, and still are, professors at the University of Washington in Seattle. Brownlee is an astronomer. He specializes in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. Ward is a paleontologist in the biology department. He specializes in major mass extinction events. He’s also a prolific author, having written 16 books.  Mostly positive reviews appeared in leading newspapers and science magazines, including Science, American Scientist, and Physics Today. Even scientists who…
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In Washington State, Assisted Suicide “Protections” Become “Barriers”

assisted suicide, barriers, Death with Dignity Act, guidelines, HB 2419, Medicine, protections, self-administration, University of Washington, Washington State
Razzle-dazzle them. That’s what good carney pitchmen do to sell their wares. So do assisted-suicide advocates. When pitching legalization, they solemnly promise that they have written, Oh, so “protective guidelines” into the legislation to prevent abuse. Then, once the law is safely in place, advocates grouse that the guidelines they touted are “obstacles” or “barriers” that unjustly prevent suffering people from accessing assisted suicide. Eventually, political agitation begins to amend the law to make things, shall we say, more flexible. A Slippery Slope We see this slippery slope process in action in Washington. Assisted suicide has been legal there for several years, and now a bill has been filed to require a university study into alleged “barriers facing Washington’s residents to the Death with Dignity Act,” and to have that…
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