Here’s How We Get Around the Wikipedia Roadblock

censorship, Center for Science & Culture, chaos, COVID-19, Creativity, destruction, editors, Evolution News, Facebook, free speech, freedom, Google, Günter Bechly, Human Zoos, Internet, Larry Sanger, lies, Long Story Short, pandemic, protest, Science Uprising, Seattle, Social media, thought police, truth, Twitter, Walter Bradley, Wikipedia, YouTube videos
Something has gone seriously wrong in our culture. Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, strict, arbitrary, and undemocratic dictates for the law-abiding, and a free-for-all for those who sow chaos disguised as “protest,” you have to wonder what will come next. In these mad times, Discovery Institute’s mission — to advance creativity over destruction — has never seemed more urgent. I want to suggest a way that you can join us in that. However, there’s a time limit: to help, you need to act by the end of Tuesday, June 30. Many Americans are isolated from others. At the same time, the King’s Highway of news, information, and inspiration — social media and other online sources — is increasingly blocked. Facebook, Google, and Twitter no longer hide their bias and censorship.  Newcomers…
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Behe Vindicated Again: Sherpas Climb Everest Easier, Because Darwin Devolves

altitude, brown bears, climbing, Daisheng Song, Darwin Devolves, Darwinism, Evolution, genes, genetic information, genome, Han Chinese, hemoglobin, Himalayas, Intelligent Design, interfertility, loss of function, lowlanders, Michael Behe, Mount Everest, mount improbable, natural selection, Nepalese, oxygen, Phd2, PNAS, polar bears, positive selection, seal meat, Sherpa, super-athletes, Tibetans, Wikipedia
How can Tibetans survive high altitudes that leave lowlanders gasping? The answer is found in broken genes. A new paper on the Tibetan genome vindicates what Michael Behe said in Darwin Devolves: evolution breaks things, but sometimes, like in the case of polar bears, the result can allow organisms to thrive in specific environments. Yes, this follows on the heels of last week’s Behe vindication; see here. A team of 16 scientists, writing in PNAS, sought to understand the genetic basis for Tibetan high-altitude adaptation in more detail. Tibetans and Nepalese, many of whom serve as guides for lowlanders wanting to conquer Mount Everest, routinely carry heavy burdens at altitudes above 14,000 feet, the average elevation on the Tibetan plateau. In its entry on Sherpa people, Wikipedia notes, Many Sherpa…
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