Is Life After Death Incompatible with Physics?

Adam Frank, Bernardo Kastrup, Big Think, Bruce Greyson, Chronicle of Higher Education, Closer to Truth, consciousness, David Chalmers, death, hard problem of consciousness, life after death, moral choice, near-death experiences, neuroscience, Neuroscience & Mind, Neuroscience News, npr, physics, Physics, Earth & Space, reason, science, Scientific American, Sean M. Carroll, Standard Model
In 2011, Sean Carroll wrote an essay on why — from a science perspective — our minds must be extinguished at death Source
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Is the End of Science Near?

bureaucracy, Carlson School of Management, citation data, Elon Musk, Evolution, Future Perfect, John Horgan, Kelsey Piper, NASA, National Academy of Science, Nature (journal), Neuroscience & Mind, PubMed, Research, Rob Sheldon, science, Scientific American, Space Physics, Technology, The Edge, The End of Science, Tibi Puiu, University of Minnesota, Vox
A study in the premier science journal notes the long term falling off of truly original findings, as opposed to endless citations of others’ findings. Source
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Origin of Life: Saved by Time?

antagonist, biochemistry, Canada, chemical reactants, early Earth, Evolution, First Life from Purely Natural Means? (series), Francis Crick, George Wald, habitability, hero, Intelligent Design, materialists, microfossils, Miracle, Nobel Prize, Nuvvuagittuq belt, origin of life, Quebec, Scientific American
Many materialists believe that the severe unlikelihood of the series of events required for the origin of life is not a serious problem. Source
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Following the Science, Doctors Joined the Nazis “In Droves”

African Americans, Africans, Alfred Hoche, Allison Hopper, Ashley K. Fernandes, biocracy, bioethicists, Bruce Chapman, Charles B. Davenport, Charles Darwin, COVID-19, Darwinists, doctors, eugenics, Evolution, evolutionary theory, Francis Galton, Germans, history, Karl Binding, Karl Pearson, Medicine, Nazis, nurses, Ohio State University, physicians, Racism, Scientific American, scientific racism, social pandemic, sterilization, Tablet, white coat, white supremacy
There is a tendency to sanctify the medical profession, with the white coat serving as an icon of wisdom, compassion, and morality. Source
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On Evolution and Racism, Scientific American Goes to War Against the Truth

African Americans, Africans, Alfred Russel Wallace, Allison Hopper, Amsterdam, Bible, border wall, Cain, Charles Darwin, Chautauqua, Darwinian theory, death penalty, Descent of Man, Electoral College, eugenics, Evolution, fake news, filibuster, Final Solution, Fox News, Francis Galton, genocide, human dignity, Human Zoos, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Intelligent Design, John West, Jon Levine, New York Post, Politics, qualified immunity, Scientific American, standardized testing, student loan debt, systemic racism, white supremacy
Given evolution’s racist baggage, you might think the theory’s proponents would be somewhat abashed to accuse the critics of Darwin of “white supremacy.” Source
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Excerpt: Letter to the Journal of Chemical Education

A Mousetrap for Darwin, biochemical pathways, Darwinian theory, Darwinism, DNA, Evolution, Intelligent Design, Journal of Chemical Education, Junk DNA, letter to the editor, molecular machinery, philosophy journals, polymerase, random mutation, science journals, Scientific American, Skeptics, students
Unlike philosophy journals — or high school newspapers — many science journals are unwilling to publish responses by people attacked in their pages. Source
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ID by Another Name? Astronomer Says 50 Percent Chance We’re Living in Computer Simulation

base reality, Bayesian reasoning, Brian Josephson, Cambridge University, Cavendish Laboratory, Columbia University, computer simulation, David Kipping, Douglas Axe, Evolution, forecast, Intelligent Design, Jonathan McLatchie, mathematics, Michael Egnor, Nobel Prize, rain, Scientific American, Twitter, umbrella
Of course, an 80 percent chance that we live in an intelligently design world compares favorably with only a 50 percent chance. Source
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Evolutionary Theorizing Depends on Magic Words

AARS, Amber Dance, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, automobile, cancer, chassis, crankshaft, Darwinians, engine, enzymes, Evolution, golf, illusion, Journal of Molecular Evolution, magic words, magicians, messenger RNA, natural selection, protein synthesis, rabbits, Richard Dawkins, Robert Shapiro, Scientific American, seats, steering wheel, The Scientist, Tokyo Institute of Science
Here is a quick tale about the evolution of the automobile. Billions of years ago, a chassis appeared.The chassis acquired an engine.The crankshaft found a side gig as a steering wheel.The steering wheel linked up with the brake pedal to form a universal joint.Seats developed. They probably arose when the first hood evolved. Now consider leading journals publishing this account after it has whisked through peer review. Is this not exactly what goes on in evolutionary theorizing? Darwinians have mastered the use of magic words that replace rigor with imagination. And they get away with it; nobody ever blows the whistle on what should be tagged a major scientific foul.  New Findings About Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases Here is an example in The Scientist, a news magazine for working scientists who should…
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In the “Mathematical Glory” of the Universe, Physicist Discovered the “Truly Divine”

A Brief History of Time, Anthropic Principle, Atheism, divine, John Horgan, mathematics, multiverse theory, physicist, physics, Physics, Earth & Space, Scientific American, Stephen Hawking, Stephen Meyer, Sunday School, The Return of the God Hypothesis
How did this slip through? John Horgan with Scientific American interviewed a physicist colleague, Christopher Search. The physicist is appealingly direct in rejecting the atheism associated with Stephen Hawking and other venerated names in the field. More than that, he says it was physics that brought him to a recognition of the “truly divine” in the universe: Over the years my view of physics has evolved significantly. I no longer believe that physics offers all of the answers. It can’t explain why the universe exists or why we are even here. It does though paint a very beautiful and intricate picture of the how the universe works. I actually feel sorry for people that do not understand the laws of physics in their full mathematical glory because they are missing…
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Bioethics Coming to Elementary and High Schools?

abortion, animals, assisted suicide, bioethics, Culture & Ethics, dead donor rule, elementary school, end of life, euthanasia, futile care, high school, ideology, Jacob M. Appel, Leon Kass, Medicine, morality, organ harvesting, philosophy, prenatal screening, President’s Council on Bioethics, puberty, religion, Scientific American, sex education, students, textbooks
Bioethicist Jacob M. Appel wants the bioethics movement to educate your children about the policy and personal conundrums that involve medical care and health public policy. He claims that “most of us give little thought” to issues that may arise, such as end-of-life care and prenatal screening. Then, when an issue does come up, people are unprepared to make wise and informed decisions. From, “The Silent Crisis of Bioethics Illiteracy,” published in Scientific American: Change will only occur when bioethics is broadly incorporated into school curricula [at an early age] and when our nation’s thought leaders begin to place emphasis on the importance of reflecting meaningfully in advance upon these issues… Often merely recognizing such issues in advance is winning the greater part of the battle. Just as we teach…
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